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Why Freetour's Business Model is so successful?

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Freetour’s Company Overview


Freetour is a global online platform that connects travelers with local guides offering free walking tours around the world. Established in 2013, the company is headquartered in Dublin, Ireland, and operates in over 100 countries. Freetour is dedicated to transforming the way people explore and experience cities by providing authentic, local, and high-quality tour experiences. With a vast array of tours offered in multiple languages, Freetour caters to a diverse range of traveler interests, including history, culture, food, and nightlife. The company's mission is to make travel experiences more accessible, affordable, and personal, thereby enhancing global tourism and cultural exchange. Business Model: Freetour operates on a unique business model that is centered around the concept of 'pay-what-you-wish'. This means that there is no upfront cost for the tours, and travelers are free to give the guide a tip based on their satisfaction with the tour. This model encourages guides to provide excellent service as their income is directly linked to customer satisfaction. The company partners with local guides and tour operators, providing them with a platform to reach a global audience. Freetour's business model is built on trust, transparency, and customer satisfaction, and it aims to encourage sustainable tourism by supporting local businesses and communities. Revenue Model: Freetour's primary source of revenue is a commission-based model where the company earns a percentage from the tips given to the guides by the travelers at the end of the tour. Additionally, Freetour also offers premium tours and experiences for which travelers pay a fixed price upfront. These premium tours often include exclusive experiences, access to certain attractions, or a more personalized service. The company also generates revenue through advertising and partnerships with local businesses and travel agencies. This diversified revenue model allows Freetour to maintain its free tour offerings while still generating income to support its operations and growth.

https://www.freetour.com/

Freetour’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: motivation, affiliation/belonging

Emotional: fun/entertainment, provides access, attractiveness

Functional: connects, informs, variety, organizes


Freetour’s Related Competitors



Freetour’s Business Operations


Advertising:

This approach generated money by sending promotional marketing messages from other businesses to customers. When you establish a for-profit company, one of the most critical aspects of your strategy is determining how to generate income. Many companies sell either products or services or a mix of the two. However, advertisers are frequently the source of the majority of all of the revenue for online businesses and media organizations. This is referred to as an ad-based income model.

Certification and endorsement:

Certification is a term that refers to the verification of an object's, person's, or organization's unique qualities. Usually, although not always, this validation comes in the form of an external review, education, evaluation, or audit. Accreditation is the procedure through which a particular organization is certified. The majority of contemporary software vendors provide certification to standardize and resell their goods and services.

Collaborative consumption:

Collaborative Consumption (CC) may be described as a collection of resource circulation systems that allow consumers to both get and supply valued resources or services, either temporarily or permanently, via direct contact with other customers or through the use of a mediator.

Collaborative production:

Producing goods in collaboration with customers based on their input, comments, naming, and price. It represents a new form of the socioeconomic output in which enormous individuals collaborate (usually over the internet). In general, initiatives based on the commons have less rigid hierarchical structures than those found on more conventional commercial models. However, sometimes not always?commons-based enterprises are structured so that contributors are not compensated financially.

Community-funded:

The critical resource in this business strategy is a community's intellect. Three distinct consumer groups comprise this multifaceted business model: believers, suppliers, and purchasers. First, believers join the online community platform and contribute to the production of goods by vendors. Second, buyers purchase these goods, which may be visual, aural, or literary in nature. Finally, believers may be purchasers or providers, and vice versa.

Cross-selling:

Cross-selling is a business strategy in which additional services or goods are offered to the primary offering to attract new consumers and retain existing ones. Numerous businesses are increasingly diversifying their product lines with items that have little resemblance to their primary offerings. Walmart is one such example; they used to offer everything but food. They want their stores to function as one-stop shops. Thus, companies mitigate their reliance on particular items and increase overall sustainability by providing other goods and services.

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Customer relationship:

Due to the high cost of client acquisition, acquiring a sizable wallet share, economies of scale are crucial. Customer relationship management (CRM) is a technique for dealing with a business's interactions with current and prospective customers that aims to analyze data about customers' interactions with a company to improve business relationships with customers, with a particular emphasis on retention, and ultimately to drive sales growth.

Experience selling:

An experience in the sales model describes how a typical user perceives or comprehends a system's operation. A product or service's value is enhanced when an extra customer experience is included. Visual representations of experience models are abstract diagrams or metaphors derived from recognizable objects, actions, or systems. User interfaces use a range of experience models to help users rapidly comprehend what is occurring in the design, where they are, and what they may do next. For example, a software experience model may depict the connection between two applications and the relationship between an application and different navigation methods and other system or software components.

Integrator:

A systems integrator is an individual or business specializing in integrating component subsystems into a unified whole and ensuring that those subsystems work correctly together. A process is known as system integration. Gains in efficiency, economies of scope, and less reliance on suppliers result in cost reductions and may improve the stability of value generation.

One-off experience:

The one-off experience business concept aims to facilitate the interaction between consumers in abundant marketplaces and their experience-seeking counterparts. This business model can only succeed if social media firms collaborate with physical event organizers, online pop-up shops, and e-commerce merchants. Developing software and participating in continuous dialogue with their consumers is insufficient. This business model provides consumers with unique experiences at a particular location during a specific event.

Online marketplace:

An online marketplace (or online e-commerce marketplace) is a kind of e-commerce website in which product or service information is supplied by various third parties or, in some instances, the brand itself, while the marketplace operator handles transactions. Additionally, this pattern encompasses peer-to-peer (P2P) e-commerce between businesses or people. By and large, since marketplaces aggregate goods from a diverse range of suppliers, the variety and availability are typically greater than in vendor-specific online retail shops. Additionally, pricing might be more competitive.

Online to Offline O2O:

Online to offline is a term (often abbreviated as O2O) used in digital marketing to refer to systems that entice customers to purchase products or services from physical companies while they are in a digital environment.

Pay what you want:

Pay what you want is a pricing approach in which purchasers determine the value of a service or a product. Allowing customers to pay whatever they want may benefit certain circumstances since it removes a slew of drawbacks associated with traditional pricing. For example, permission to pay whatever they want attracts buyers for a variety of reasons, including eliminating the worry of whether a product is worth a fixed price and the associated danger of disappointment (buyer's remorse). For sellers, this eliminates the time-consuming and often expensive process of establishing the correct pricing (which may vary for different market segments).

Peer to Peer (P2P):

A peer-to-peer, or P2P, service is a decentralized platform that enables two people to communicate directly, without the need for a third-party intermediary or the usage of a corporation providing a product or service. For example, the buyer and seller do business now via the P2P service. Certain peer-to-peer (P2P) services do not include economic transactions such as buying and selling but instead connect people to collaborate on projects, exchange information, and communicate without the need for an intermediary. The organizing business provides a point of contact for these people, often an online database and communication service. The renting of personal goods, the supply of particular products or services, or the exchange of knowledge and experiences are all examples of transactions.

Radical transparency:

The concept of radical transparency, or everyone knowing everything, has the potential to be a significant driver of improved organizational performance. This is especially true for new, fast-growing businesses that are under pressure to achieve aggressive sales targets and keep their investors pleased. In governance, politics, software design, and business, radical transparency refers to activities and methods that significantly enhance organizational processes and data openness.

Self-service:

A retail business model in which consumers self-serve the goods they want to buy. Self-service business concepts include self-service food buffets, self-service petrol stations, and self-service markets. Self-service is available through phone, online, and email to automate customer support interactions. Self-service Software and self-service applications (for example, online banking apps, shopping portals, and self-service check-in at airports) are becoming more prevalent.

Transaction facilitator:

The business acts as an acquirer, processing payments on behalf of online merchants, auction sites, and other commercial users for a fee. This encompasses all elements of purchasing, selling, and exchanging currencies at current or predetermined exchange rates. By far the biggest market in the world in terms of trade volume. The largest multinational banks are the leading players in this industry. Around the globe, financial hubs serve as anchors for trade between a diverse range of various kinds of buyers and sellers 24 hours a day, save on weekends.

Two-sided market:

Two-sided marketplaces, also called two-sided networks, are commercial platforms featuring two different user groups that mutually profit from the web. A multi-sided platform is an organization that generates value mainly via the facilitation of direct contacts between two (or more) distinct kinds of connected consumers (MSP). A two-sided market enables interactions between many interdependent consumer groups. The platform's value grows as more groups or individual members of each group use it. For example, eBay is a marketplace that links buyers and sellers. Google connects advertising and searchers. Social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook are also bidirectional, linking consumers and marketers.

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