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Why citizenM's Business Model is so successful?

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citizenM’s Company Overview


CitizenM is a pioneering hospitality brand renowned for redefining affordable luxury in the hotel industry. Founded in 2008 in the Netherlands, the company aims to offer a new kind of hotel experience for a new type of traveler – the mobile citizen. CitizenM stands for 'citizen mobile,' reflecting its commitment to providing value, comfort, and convenience for travelers who appreciate luxury without the excessive costs traditionally associated with it. The company’s hotels are strategically located in some of the world's most famous cities and are designed to focus on simplicity, connectivity, and efficiency. Each hotel features innovative, modern design, high-tech amenities, and a 24/7 dining facility to create a comfortable, seamless experience for the contemporary traveler. Business Model: CitizenM operates on a unique business model that combines elements of traditional hospitality with innovative technology and design. The company's hotels are purpose-built, using modular construction techniques, which allow for faster and more cost-effective building. This also results in a consistent look and feel across all properties. CitizenM's focus on technology is another distinguishing factor. From online-only booking and check-in to in-room tablets controlling room settings, the firm heavily relies on technology to streamline operations and enhance the guest experience. An emphasis on shared spaces encourages social interaction among guests, with lobbies designed as living rooms filled with contemporary art and designer furniture. Revenue Model: CitizenM's revenue model primarily relies on its room rental services. The company operates on a fixed-rate pricing model, offering a single type of room at a flat rate, regardless of the city. This straightforward pricing strategy eliminates unnecessary extras and helps maintain affordability. In addition to room revenues, CitizenM generates income from its food and beverage services, available 24/7 in its 'canteens.' Furthermore, the company has embraced the co-working trend by offering subscription-based access to its stylishly designed communal spaces, providing another revenue stream. By combining these revenue sources with its cost-effective business model, CitizenM ensures its financial sustainability while maintaining its commitment to affordable luxury.

https://www.citizenm.com/

Country: Netherlands

Foundations date: 2008

Type: Private

Sector: Consumer Services

Categories: Travel


citizenM’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging, motivation

Emotional: design/aesthetics, provides access, attractiveness

Functional: simplifies, connects, quality, variety, sensory appeal


citizenM’s Related Competitors



citizenM’s Business Operations


Culture is brand:

It requires workers to live brand values to solve issues, make internal choices, and provide a branded consumer. Developing a distinctive and enduring cultural brand is the advertising industry's holy grail. Utilizing the hazy combination of time, attitude, and emotion to identify and replicate an ideology is near to marketing magic.

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Customer relationship:

Due to the high cost of client acquisition, acquiring a sizable wallet share, economies of scale are crucial. Customer relationship management (CRM) is a technique for dealing with a business's interactions with current and prospective customers that aims to analyze data about customers' interactions with a company to improve business relationships with customers, with a particular emphasis on retention, and ultimately to drive sales growth.

Digital:

A digital strategy is a strategic management and a business reaction or solution to a digital issue, which is often best handled as part of a broader company plan. A digital strategy is frequently defined by the application of new technologies to existing business activities and a focus on enabling new digital skills for their company (such as those formed by the Information Age and frequently as a result of advances in digital technologies such as computers, data, telecommunication services, and the World wide web, to name a few).

Digital transformation:

Digitalization is the systematic and accelerated transformation of company operations, processes, skills, and models to fully exploit the changes and possibilities brought about by digital technology and its effect on society. Digital transformation is a journey with many interconnected intermediate objectives, with the ultimate aim of continuous enhancement of processes, divisions, and the business ecosystem in a hyperconnected age. Therefore, establishing the appropriate bridges for the trip is critical to success.

Disruptive trends:

A disruptive technology supplants an existing technology and fundamentally alters an industry or a game-changing innovation that establishes an altogether new industry. Disruptive innovation is defined as an invention that shows a new market and value network and ultimately disrupts an established market and value network, replacing incumbent market-leading companies, products, and alliances.

Ecosystem:

A business ecosystem is a collection of related entities ? suppliers, distributors, customers, rivals, and government agencies ? collaborating and providing a particular product or service. The concept is that each entity in the ecosystem influences and is impacted by the others, resulting in an ever-changing connection. Therefore, each entity must be adaptive and flexible to live, much like a biological ecosystem. These connections are often backed by a shared technical platform and are based on the flow of information, resources, and artifacts in the software ecosystem.

Experience selling:

An experience in the sales model describes how a typical user perceives or comprehends a system's operation. A product or service's value is enhanced when an extra customer experience is included. Visual representations of experience models are abstract diagrams or metaphors derived from recognizable objects, actions, or systems. User interfaces use a range of experience models to help users rapidly comprehend what is occurring in the design, where they are, and what they may do next. For example, a software experience model may depict the connection between two applications and the relationship between an application and different navigation methods and other system or software components.

Flat rate:

This model is used to describe a pricing system that charges a single flat price for service regardless of its actual use or duration. A company may establish a responsible position in a market if customers get excellent pricing before performing the service. The consumer benefits from a straightforward cost structure, while the business benefits from a predictable income stream.

Lease:

The item that's being sold is now available for rent on an hourly/daily/monthly/yearly basis. A lease is a contract that specifies the terms under which one can rent a property. It ensures the lessee, the tenant, access to an asset, and the lessor, the property owner or landlord, receives monthly payments from the lessee for a predetermined period of months or years. Both the lessee and the lessor risk penalties for breaching the contract's conditions.

Low cost:

A pricing strategy in which a business provides a low price in order to drive demand and increase market share. Additionally referred to as a low-price approach. The low-cost model has sparked a revolution in the airline industry. The end-user benefits from low-cost tickets as a result of a revenue strategy that seeks various sources of income. Ryanair was one of the first businesses to embrace this approach.

Mass customization:

Mass customization is a strategy that entails using modular goods and manufacturing processes to allow efficient product individualization. Mass customization refers to producing customized output using flexible computer-aided manufacturing systems in marketing, manufacturing, contact centers, and management. Mass customization is the next frontier for manufacturing and service sectors alike. Beyond the physical product, mass customization is utilized by a diverse variety of software products and services with the goal of developing strong connections with customers via personalization and suggestion.

No frills:

A no frills service or product has been stripped of non-essential elements to keep the price low. Initially, the word frills referred to a kind of cloth embellishment. Something provided free of charge to clients may be a frill - for example, complimentary beverages on airline flights or a radio fitted in a rental vehicle. No-frills companies rely on the premise that by eliminating opulent extras, consumers may benefit from reduced costs. Budget airlines, supermarkets, holidays, and pre-owned cars are examples of everyday goods and services with no-frills branding.

Online marketplace:

An online marketplace (or online e-commerce marketplace) is a kind of e-commerce website in which product or service information is supplied by various third parties or, in some instances, the brand itself, while the marketplace operator handles transactions. Additionally, this pattern encompasses peer-to-peer (P2P) e-commerce between businesses or people. By and large, since marketplaces aggregate goods from a diverse range of suppliers, the variety and availability are typically greater than in vendor-specific online retail shops. Additionally, pricing might be more competitive.

Subscription:

Subscription business models are built on the concept of providing a product or service in exchange for recurring subscription income on a monthly or annual basis. As a result, they place a higher premium on client retention than on customer acquisition. Subscription business models, in essence, concentrate on revenue generation in such a manner that a single client makes repeated payments for extended access to a product or service. Cable television, internet providers, software suppliers, websites (e.g., blogs), business solutions providers, and financial services companies utilize this approach, as do conventional newspapers, periodicals, and academic publications.

Rent instead of buy:

Services that do not need the product to be purchased but rather rent it for the economic benefit of requiring less money to access the commodity. When you rent, you assume less obligation since most of the burden is placed on the owner's shoulders. There is no debt; you are just responsible for the monthly rent. When renting, you have more flexibility by signing a six-month or one-year lease. This implies that you will be confined to that location for at least that period. When your lease term expires, you have the option of switching to another product or renewing your lease.

Ultimate luxury:

This business approach is based on product distinctiveness and a high level of quality, emphasizing individuals with significant buying power. The expenditures required to create distinction are covered by the comparatively high prices charged, which often allow for very high profits.

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