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Sanofi’s Business Strategy Case Study

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Sanofi’s Company Overview


Sanofi SA, formerly Sanofi-Aventis, is a healthcare company engaged in the research, development, manufacture, and marketing of therapeutic solutions. It operates through three segments: Pharmaceuticals, Human Vaccines (Vaccines), and Animal Health. The Pharmaceuticals segment consists of research, development, production, and marketing of medicines, including those originating from Genzyme Corporation. Its pharmaceuticals portfolio consists of products and a range of prescription medicines, generic medicines, and consumer health products. The Vaccines segment is dedicated to vaccines, including research, development, production, and marketing. The Animal Health segment includes the research, development, production, and marketing activities of Merial, which offers a range of medicines and vaccines for a range of animal species. It operates in the Other segment, which includes the effects of retained commitments. It operates through Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc.

www.sanofi.com

Country: France

Foundations date: 2004

Type: Public

Sector: Healthcare

Categories: Pharmaceuticals


Sanofi’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: provides hope

Emotional: reduces anxiety, wellness, therapeutic value, badge value, provides access

Functional: reduces risks, avoids hassles, quality, integrates, variety


Sanofi’s Related Competitors


Sanofi AstraZeneca Phoenix Pharmahandel GlaxoSmithKline Novartis Pfizer

Sanofi’s Business Operations


Biopharma:

A firm assumes complete control of the biopharmaceutical model's research, development, and commercialization (DDC) operations. Under this approach, the firm develops the product internally and retains commercial skills to deliver the product to patients.

Cross-subsidiary:

When products and goods and products and services are integrated, they form a subsidiary side and a money side, maximizing the overall revenue impact. A subsidiary is a firm owned entirely or in part by another business, referred to as the parent company or holding company. A parent company with subsidiaries is a kind of conglomerate, a corporation that consists of several distinct companies; sometimes, the national or worldwide dispersion of the offices necessitates the establishment of subsidiaries.

Decomposition:

Simplifying many product kinds inside a product group or set of goods. A technique for doing business analysis in which a complex business process is dissected to reveal its constituent parts. Functional decomposition is a technique that may be used to contribute to an understanding and management of large and complicated processes and assist in issue solving. Additionally, functional decomposition is utilized in computer engineering to aid in the creation of software.

Healthcare:

The prevention, treatment, and management of disease and maintaining mental and physical well-being via the medical and allied health professionals' services. It includes diagnostic, preventative, remedial, and therapeutic service providers such as physicians, nurses, hospitals, and other private, public, and volunteer organizations. Additionally, it comprises producers of medical equipment and pharmaceuticals, as well as health insurance companies.

Licensing:

A formal agreement in which the owner of the copyright, know-how, patent, service mark, trademark, or other intellectual property grants a licensee the right to use, manufacture, and sell copies of the original. These agreements often restrict the licensee's scope or area of operation, define whether the license is exclusive or non-exclusive, and stipulate whether the licensee will pay royalties or another kind of compensation in return. While licensing agreements are often used to commercialize the technology, franchisees also utilize them to encourage the sale of products and services.

Lock-in:

The lock-in strategy?in which a business locks in consumers by imposing a high barrier to transferring to a competitor?has acquired new traction with New Economy firms during the last decade.

Low touch:

Historically, developing a standard touch sales model for business sales required recruiting and training a Salesforce user who was tasked with the responsibility of generating quality leads, arranging face-to-face meetings, giving presentations, and eventually closing transactions. However, the idea of a low-touch sales strategy is not new; it dates all the way back to the 1980s.

Make and distribute:

In this arrangement, the producer creates the product and distributes it to distributors, who oversee the goods' ongoing management in the market.

Regular replacement:

It includes items that must be replaced on a regular basis; the user cannot reuse them. Consumables are products utilized by people and companies and must be returned regularly due to wear and tear or depletion. Additionally, they may be described as components of a final product consumed or irreversibly changed throughout the production process, including semiconductor wafers and basic chemicals.

White label:

The term white label refers to a product or service bought by a reseller who rebrands it to show that the new owner developed it. Frequently, white-label goods are mass manufactured. Thus, white-label goods are produced by one firm and sold by another under their brand and model number. For instance, most Dell computer screens are created by third-party manufacturers yet have the Dell brand and model number.

Why Sanofi’s Business Model is so successful?

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