This web app uses cookies to compile statistic information of our users visits. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. If you wish you may change your preference or read about cookies

close

Why Streetline's Business Model is so successful?

Get all the answers


Streetline’s Company Overview


Streetline is a leading smart parking company that specializes in delivering innovative sensor-based solutions to manage parking spaces in urban areas. The company is headquartered in Foster City, California, and operates on a global scale, providing its services to cities, universities, and private operators. Streetline leverages advanced technology, including real-time data collection and predictive analytics, to optimize parking management, reduce congestion, and improve urban mobility. The company's pioneering efforts have been recognized by several awards and accolitions, including the Wall Street Journal Technology Innovation Award. Streetline's business model is primarily based on providing smart parking solutions to its clients. The company installs sensor networks in parking areas to collect real-time data about parking space availability. This data is then analyzed and delivered to drivers through a user-friendly mobile application, helping them find available parking spaces quickly and conveniently. In addition, Streetline offers cloud-based analytics and reporting tools for parking operators, enabling them to manage their parking assets more efficiently. The revenue model of Streetline revolves around a combination of hardware sales, software subscriptions, and data analytics services. The company generates income by selling its sensor devices to parking operators and municipalities. It also charges a regular subscription fee for access to its cloud-based software platform, which provides real-time parking data and analytical tools. Moreover, Streetline offers data analytics services, helping clients to understand parking patterns and make data-driven decisions. This diversified revenue model allows Streetline to maintain a steady income stream while providing valuable services to its clients.

https://www.streetline.com/

Country: California

Foundations date: 2005

Type: Private

Sector: Technology

Categories: Mobility


Streetline’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: design/aesthetics, provides access

Functional: saves time, simplifies, integrates, connects, reduces effort, informs


Streetline’s Related Competitors



Streetline’s Business Operations


Combining data within and across industries:

How can data from other sources be integrated to generate additional value? The science of big data, combined with emerging IT standards that enable improved data integration, enables new information coordination across businesses or sectors. As a result, intelligent executives across industries will see big data for what it is: a revolution in management. However, as with any other significant organizational transformation, the difficulties associated with becoming a big data-enabled company may be tremendous and require hands-on?or, in some instances, hands-off?leadership.

Customer data:

It primarily offers free services to users, stores their personal information, and acts as a platform for users to interact with one another. Additional value is generated by gathering and processing consumer data in advantageous ways for internal use or transfer to interested third parties. Revenue is produced by either directly selling the data to outsiders or by leveraging it for internal reasons, such as increasing the efficacy of advertising. Thus, innovative, sustainable Big Data business models are as prevalent and desired as they are elusive (i.e., data is the new oil).

Data as a Service (DaaS):

Data as a Service (DaaS) is a relative of Software as a Service in computing (SaaS). As with other members of the as a service (aaS) family, DaaS is based on the idea that the product (in this instance, data) may be delivered to the user on-demand independent of the provider's geographic or organizational isolation from the customer. Additionally, with the advent[when?] of service-oriented architecture (SOA), the platform on which the data sits has become unimportant. This progression paved the way for the relatively recent new idea of DaaS to arise.

Data warehouses:

A data warehouse (DW or DWH), sometimes referred to as an enterprise data warehouse (EDW), is a computer term that refers to a system used for reporting and data analysis. It is a critical component of business intelligence. DWs are the centralized repository for data that has been integrated from one or more separate sources. They keep track of both data and information and generate analytical reports for skilled professionals throughout the business.

Digital transformation:

Digitalization is the systematic and accelerated transformation of company operations, processes, skills, and models to fully exploit the changes and possibilities brought about by digital technology and its effect on society. Digital transformation is a journey with many interconnected intermediate objectives, with the ultimate aim of continuous enhancement of processes, divisions, and the business ecosystem in a hyperconnected age. Therefore, establishing the appropriate bridges for the trip is critical to success.

Digitization:

This pattern is based on the capacity to convert current goods or services into digital versions, which have several benefits over intangible products, including increased accessibility and speed of distribution. In an ideal world, the digitalization of a product or service would occur without compromising the consumer value proposition. In other words, efficiency and multiplication achieved via digitalization do not detract from the consumer's perceived value. Being digitally sustainable encompasses all aspects of sustaining the institutional framework for developing and maintaining digital objects and resources and ensuring their long-term survival.

Licensing:

A formal agreement in which the owner of the copyright, know-how, patent, service mark, trademark, or other intellectual property grants a licensee the right to use, manufacture, and sell copies of the original. These agreements often restrict the licensee's scope or area of operation, define whether the license is exclusive or non-exclusive, and stipulate whether the licensee will pay royalties or another kind of compensation in return. While licensing agreements are often used to commercialize the technology, franchisees also utilize them to encourage the sale of products and services.

Location-based advertising:

Location-based advertising is predicated on the fact that we now take our phones with us everywhere we go. Additionally, most of us are content to share our location data with the different applications we use. This enables marketers to tailor their messaging to individuals depending on their current location. Instantaneously. Advertisers may deliver various messages to other individuals based on the location data obtained from their mobile devices.

On-demand economy:

The on-demand economy is described as economic activity generated by digital marketplaces that meet customer demand for products and services via quick access and accessible supply. The supply chain is managed via a highly efficient, intuitive digital mesh built on top of current infrastructure networks. The on-demand economy is transforming commercial behavior in cities worldwide. The number of businesses, the categories covered, and the industry's growth rate are all increasing. Businesses in this new economy are the culmination of years of technological progress and customer behavior change.

Performance-based contracting:

Performance-based contracting (PBC), sometimes referred to as performance-based logistics (PBL) or performance-based acquisition, is a method for achieving quantifiable supplier performance. A PBC strategy focuses on developing strategic performance measures and the direct correlation of contract payment to success against these criteria. Availability, dependability, maintainability, supportability, and total cost of ownership are all standard criteria. This is accomplished mainly via incentive-based, long-term contracts with precise and quantifiable operational performance targets set by the client and agreed upon by contractual parties.

Subscription:

Subscription business models are built on the concept of providing a product or service in exchange for recurring subscription income on a monthly or annual basis. As a result, they place a higher premium on client retention than on customer acquisition. Subscription business models, in essence, concentrate on revenue generation in such a manner that a single client makes repeated payments for extended access to a product or service. Cable television, internet providers, software suppliers, websites (e.g., blogs), business solutions providers, and financial services companies utilize this approach, as do conventional newspapers, periodicals, and academic publications.

Technology trends:

New technologies that are now being created or produced in the next five to ten years will significantly change the economic and social landscape. These include but are not limited to information technology, wireless data transmission, human-machine connection, on-demand printing, biotechnology, and sophisticated robotics.

Transportation as a Service (TaaS):

Transportation as a Service (TaaS), also referred to as Mobility as a Service (MaaS), refers to a trend away from privately owned means of transportation and toward subscription-based mobility solutions. This is accomplished by integrating transportation services from public and private suppliers through a unified gateway that organizes and maintains the journey, which customers may pay for with a single account. Users may either pay per journey or subscribe to a monthly subscription for a certain distance.

Embed code:

x
Copy the code below and embed it in yours to show this business model canvas in your website.