This web app uses cookies to compile statistic information of our users visits. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. If you wish you may change your preference or read about cookies

close

Why Astranis's Business Model is so successful?

Get all the answers


Astranis’s Company Overview


Astranis is an innovative aerospace company specializing in the development and deployment of small, low-cost telecommunications satellites. Founded in 2015, the San Francisco-based company is committed to solving the problem of internet connectivity across the globe. Their mission is to improve and expand internet access for the billions of people who don't have it or are under-served. Astranis' compact yet powerful satellites are designed to connect specific regions on Earth, providing high-speed internet to even the most remote corners of the world. Their team comprises of some of the best engineers and experts in the field, all dedicated to revolutionizing the satellite industry and bridging the global digital divide. Astranis operates on a business model that involves designing, manufacturing, and launching their own satellites. They focus on creating small, cost-effective satellites that can be quickly deployed to geostationary orbit (GEO), providing dedicated internet service for specific geographic areas. This approach allows them to offer more affordable and accessible internet services, especially to remote and underserved regions. Astranis works closely with local internet service providers (ISPs), governments, and organizations to ensure their satellites meet the unique needs of each region they serve. The revenue model of Astranis is primarily based on selling bandwidth to internet service providers, mobile network operators, and governments. They lease the capacity provided by their satellites to these entities, who in turn offer internet services to end-users. This ensures a steady stream of income for the company while also allowing them to scale their operations and develop more advanced satellite technology. Additionally, Astranis may generate revenue through partnerships and collaborations with other companies and organizations in the space and technology sectors.

https://www.astranis.com/

Country: California

Foundations date: 2015

Type: Private

Sector: Telecommunications

Categories: Aerospace


Astranis’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: motivation, affiliation/belonging

Emotional: provides access, design/aesthetics

Functional: connects, informs, quality


Astranis’s Related Competitors



Astranis’s Business Operations


Blue ocean strategy:

The blue ocean approach is predicated on the premise that market limits and industry structure are not predetermined and may be reconfigured via the actions and attitudes of industry participants. This is referred to as the reconstructionist perspective by the writers. Assuming that structure and market boundaries exist solely in managers' thoughts, practitioners who subscribe to this perspective avoid being constrained by actual market structures. To them, more demand exists, primarily untapped. The core of the issue is determining how to produce it.

Aikido:

The aikido business model is often characterized as using a competitor's strength to get an edge over them. This is accomplished through finding weaknesses in a competitor's strategic position. In addition, it adds to marketing sustainability by exposing rivals' flaws, finding internal and external areas for development, and attracting consumers via specific product offers that deviate from the norm.

Demand then made:

Early applications in distribution, production, and buying combined to form the supply chain. However, due to investments in information technology, cost analysis, and process analysis, traditional supply networks have been converted into quicker, cheaper, and more dependable contemporary supply chains. The second side of the value chain is marketing, sales, and service, which generate and maintain demand and are referred to as the market then made.

Corporate innovation:

Innovation is the outcome of collaborative creativity in turning an idea into a feasible concept, accompanied by a collaborative effort to bring that concept to life as a product, service, or process improvement. The digital era has created an environment conducive to business model innovation since technology has transformed how businesses operate and provide services to consumers.

Low cost:

A pricing strategy in which a business provides a low price in order to drive demand and increase market share. Additionally referred to as a low-price approach. The low-cost model has sparked a revolution in the airline industry. The end-user benefits from low-cost tickets as a result of a revenue strategy that seeks various sources of income. Ryanair was one of the first businesses to embrace this approach.

Performance-based contracting:

Performance-based contracting (PBC), sometimes referred to as performance-based logistics (PBL) or performance-based acquisition, is a method for achieving quantifiable supplier performance. A PBC strategy focuses on developing strategic performance measures and the direct correlation of contract payment to success against these criteria. Availability, dependability, maintainability, supportability, and total cost of ownership are all standard criteria. This is accomplished mainly via incentive-based, long-term contracts with precise and quantifiable operational performance targets set by the client and agreed upon by contractual parties.

Space technology:

Space technology is a term that refers to technology created by space science or the aerospace industry for use in spaceflight, satellites, and space exploration. Space technology includes spacecraft, satellites, space stations, and the infrastructure, equipment, and procedures necessary to support them. Space is such an unfamiliar environment that was trying to operate in it necessitates developing innovative tools and methods. In addition, numerous daily services, like weather forecasting, remote sensing, GPS systems, satellite television, and specific long-distance communications systems, depend heavily on space infrastructure.

Licensing:

A formal agreement in which the owner of the copyright, know-how, patent, service mark, trademark, or other intellectual property grants a licensee the right to use, manufacture, and sell copies of the original. These agreements often restrict the licensee's scope or area of operation, define whether the license is exclusive or non-exclusive, and stipulate whether the licensee will pay royalties or another kind of compensation in return. While licensing agreements are often used to commercialize the technology, franchisees also utilize them to encourage the sale of products and services.

Skunkworks project:

A skunkworks project is one that is created by a small, loosely organized group of individuals who study and develop a project with the primary goal of radical innovation. The terminology arose during World War II with Lockheed's Skunk Works project. However, since its inception with Skunk Works, the phrase has been used to refer to comparable high-priority research and development initiatives at other big companies that include a small team operating outside of their regular working environment and free of managerial restrictions. Typically, the phrase alludes to semi-secretive technological initiatives, such as Google X Lab.

Lease:

The item that's being sold is now available for rent on an hourly/daily/monthly/yearly basis. A lease is a contract that specifies the terms under which one can rent a property. It ensures the lessee, the tenant, access to an asset, and the lessor, the property owner or landlord, receives monthly payments from the lessee for a predetermined period of months or years. Both the lessee and the lessor risk penalties for breaching the contract's conditions.

Product innovation:

Product innovation is the process of developing and introducing a new or better version of an existing product or service. This is a broader definition of innovation than the generally recognized definition, which includes creating new goods that are considered innovative in this context. For example, Apple launched a succession of successful new products and services in 2001?the iPod, the iTunes online music service, and the iPhone?which catapulted the firm to the top of its industry.

Solution provider:

A solution provider consolidates all goods and services in a particular domain into a single point of contact. As a result, the client is supplied with a unique know-how to improve efficiency and performance. As a Solution Provider, a business may avoid revenue loss by broadening the scope of the service it offers, which adds value to the product. Additionally, close client interaction enables a better understanding of the customer's habits and requirements, enhancing goods and services.

Embed code:

x
Copy the code below and embed it in yours to show this business model canvas in your website.