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Azuri Technologies’s Business Strategy Case Study

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Azuri Technologies’s Company Overview


Azuri Technologies is a commercial provider of Pay2Go solar systems to rural off-grid communities. With the widest reach of any provider in sub-Saharan Africa, the company is addressing the problem of energy access. Azuri brings a solution to 1.3 billion people around the world who lack access to an energy grid.

http://www.azuri-technologies.com/

Country: United Kingdom

Foundations date: 2012

Type: Private

Sector: Energy & Utilities

Categories: Energy


Azuri Technologies’s Customer Needs


Social impact: self-transcendence

Life changing: provides hope, motivation, affiliation/belonging

Emotional: rewards me, design/aesthetics, badge value, attractiveness, provides access

Functional: saves time, simplifies, reduces effort, connects, informs, makes money, avoid hassles, integrates, organizes


Azuri Technologies’s Related Competitors


State Power investment E.ON RWE AG Tokyo Electric Power Korea Electric Power Corporation China Huaneng Group

Azuri Technologies’s Business Operations


Blended value:

Blended value is a relatively new conceptual framework in which non-profit organizations, companies, and investments are assessed on their capacity to create a combination of financial, social, and environmental value. Businesses that use mixed value business models actively enhance their social impact while maintaining economic efficiency. A fair-trade coffee cooperative, for example, generates social value via guaranteed minimum prices given to coffee growers and direct investments in community development.

Credits:

A credit arrangement is when a consumer purchases items on credit (without paying cash) and spends the provider later. Typically, trade credit is extended for a certain number of days after the products are delivered. These credits may be deducted from one's tax liability.

Energy:

Energy development is an area of study concerned with adequate primary and secondary energy sources to satisfy society's requirements. These activities include those that promote the development of conventional, alternative, and renewable energy sources and the recovery and recycling of energy that otherwise would have been squandered.

Localized low cost:

In general, this business model is appropriate for standardized goods and services with minimal requirements and low consumer expectations that may be manufactured locally and branded worldwide. However, this company concept will succeed only if the following two criteria are satisfied. The first is contingent upon a sizable market presence in mature markets' urban regions. This circumstance enables businesses to capitalize on their established brand value in developing areas. The second criterion is that the product or service generates revenue or is self-sustaining. This circumstance creates the possibility of reduced earnings in developing economies.

Pay as you go:

Pay as you go (PAYG) business models charge based on actual consumption or use of a product or service. Specific mobile phone contracts work on this principle, in which the user may purchase a phone card that provides credit. However, each call is billed separately, and the credit balance is depleted as the minutes are used (in contrast to subscription models where you pay a monthly fee for calls). Pay as you go is another term for pay & go, pay per use, pay per use, or pay-as-you-go.

Product innovation:

Product innovation is the process of developing and introducing a new or better version of an existing product or service. This is a broader definition of innovation than the generally recognized definition, which includes creating new goods that are considered innovative in this context. For example, Apple launched a succession of successful new products and services in 2001?the iPod, the iTunes online music service, and the iPhone?which catapulted the firm to the top of its industry.

Revenue sharing:

Revenue sharing occurs in various forms, but each iteration includes the sharing of operational gains or losses amongst connected financial players. Occasionally, revenue sharing is utilized as an incentive program ? for example, a small company owner may pay partners or colleagues a percentage-based commission for recommending new clients. Occasionally, revenue sharing is utilized to share the earnings generated by a corporate partnership.

Social stakeholder:

Social responsibility will only be accurate if many managers embrace moral leadership rather than immoral leadership, organizational management, and business ethics that engage morals and values in corporate governance. In a nutshell, it addresses the concept of who or what really matters.

Solution provider:

A solution provider consolidates all goods and services in a particular domain into a single point of contact. As a result, the client is supplied with a unique know-how to improve efficiency and performance. As a Solution Provider, a business may avoid revenue loss by broadening the scope of the service it offers, which adds value to the product. Additionally, close client interaction enables a better understanding of the customer's habits and requirements, enhancing goods and services.

Sustainability-focused:

Companies that manufacture fast-moving consumer goods and services and are committed to sustainability do ecological impact assessments on their products and services. While research-based green marketing needs facts, green storytelling requires imagination and location. Employees responsible for the brand definition and green marketers collaborate with product and service designers, environmental groups, and government agencies.

Why Azuri Technologies’s Business Model is so successful?

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