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Why Cashify's Business Model is so successful?

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Cashify’s Company Overview


Cashify is a leading online platform in India that specializes in exchanging and resale used electronic devices. The company provides users a convenient and efficient solution to sell their old smartphones, laptops, tablets, and other electronic gadgets. Operating through a user-friendly mobile application and website, Cashify enables individuals to assess the value of their devices, get instant price quotes, and schedule doorstep pickups for a seamless transaction process. Leveraging a transparent and hassle-free model, Cashify benefits sellers by offering fair market prices for their used electronics and contributes to the reduction of electronic waste by promoting the recycling and refurbishing of devices. The business model revolves around a commission-based structure, where Cashify earns a percentage of the resale value of each device. Additionally, the company provides value-added services, such as device data wiping and extended warranties, enhancing the overall customer experience and reinforcing its position as a trusted player in the pre-owned electronics market.

https://www.cashify.in/

Country: Delhi

Foundations date: 2013

Type: Private

Sector: Consumer Services

Categories: eCommerce


Cashify’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: rewards me, fun/entertainment, therapeutic value

Functional: saves time, simplifies, reduces risk, reduces effort, reduces cost, quality, variety, informs


Cashify’s Related Competitors



Cashify’s Business Operations


Reverse engineering:

It is a legally sanctioned technique of duplicating a technology in which, rather than beginning from scratch, one starts with an existing product and works backward to determine how it works. Once the product's basic principle or core idea is established, the next stage is to replicate the same outcomes using other methods to prevent (legally prohibited) patent infringement. The cost of manufacturing is significantly lowered.

Reverse auction:

A reverse auction is a kind of auction in which the bidder and seller take on the roles of each other. In a conventional auction (also referred to as a forward auction), bidders compete for products or services by submitting rising bids. In a reverse auction, vendors fight for the buyer's business, and prices usually fall as sellers underbid one another. A reverse auction is comparable to a unique bid auction. The fundamental concept is the same; nevertheless, a bid auction adheres more closely to the conventional auction structure. For example, each offer is kept private, and only one clear winner is determined after the auction concludes.

Platform as a Service (PaaS):

Platform as a Service (PaaS) is a class of cloud computing services that enable users to create, operate, and manage apps without the burden of establishing and maintaining the infrastructure usually involved with designing and developing an app.

Sharing economy:

The sharing economy eliminates the necessity for individual asset ownership. The phrase sharing economy is an umbrella word that encompasses various definitions and is often used to refer to economic and social activity that involves online transactions. Originally coined by the open-source community to refer to peer-to-peer sharing of access to goods and services, the term is now occasionally used more broadly to refer to any sales transaction conducted via online marketplaces, including those that are business to consumer (B2C) than peer-to-peer.

Software as a Service (SaaS):

Software as a Service (SaaS) is a paradigm for licensing and delivering subscription-based and centrally hosted software. Occasionally, the term on-demand software is used. SaaS is usually accessible through a web browser via a thin client. SaaS has established itself as the de facto delivery mechanism for a large number of commercial apps. SaaS has been integrated into virtually every major enterprise Software company's strategy.

Reseller:

Resellers are businesses or individuals (merchants) that acquire products or services to resell them instead of consuming or utilizing them. This is often done for financial gain (but could be resold at a loss). Resellers are well-known for doing business on the internet through websites. One instance is the telecommunications sector, in which corporations purchase surplus transmission capacity or take the call from other providers and resell it to regional carriers.

Reverse innovation:

Reverse innovation is a strategy that involves creating inventions in emerging (or developing) markets and then distributing/marketing them in established ones. For example, numerous businesses make goods in rising economies like China and India and then export them.

Online marketplace:

An online marketplace (or online e-commerce marketplace) is a kind of e-commerce website in which product or service information is supplied by various third parties or, in some instances, the brand itself, while the marketplace operator handles transactions. Additionally, this pattern encompasses peer-to-peer (P2P) e-commerce between businesses or people. By and large, since marketplaces aggregate goods from a diverse range of suppliers, the variety and availability are typically greater than in vendor-specific online retail shops. Additionally, pricing might be more competitive.

Subscription:

Subscription business models are built on the concept of providing a product or service in exchange for recurring subscription income on a monthly or annual basis. As a result, they place a higher premium on client retention than on customer acquisition. Subscription business models, in essence, concentrate on revenue generation in such a manner that a single client makes repeated payments for extended access to a product or service. Cable television, internet providers, software suppliers, websites (e.g., blogs), business solutions providers, and financial services companies utilize this approach, as do conventional newspapers, periodicals, and academic publications.

eCommerce:

Electronic commerce, or e-commerce (alternatively spelled eCommerce), is a business model, or a subset of a larger business model, that allows a company or person to do business via an electronic network, usually the internet. As a result, customers gain from increased accessibility and convenience, while the business benefits from integrating sales and distribution with other internal operations. Electronic commerce is prevalent throughout all four main market segments: business to business, business to consumer, consumer to consumer, and consumer to business. Ecommerce may be used to sell almost any goods or service, from books and music to financial services and airline tickets.

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