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Why China Minmetals's Business Model is so successful?

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China Minmetals’s Company Overview


China Minmetals Corporation is a Chinese metals and mineral trading company headquartered in Beijing. It is a State-owned corporation under direct supervision of the State-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission (SASAC). China Minmetals is engaged in the production and trading of metals and minerals, including copper, aluminum, tungsten, tin, antimony, lead, zinc, and nickel. It is one of the largest metals and minerals trading companies in the world and the largest iron and steel trader in China. The company handles more than 12 million tons of steel products annually. It also trades iron, coke, coal, copper, zinc, and lead. In addition to the trade of metals, China Minmetals also trades in electrical products and operates subsidiaries that focus on real estate development, marine shipping, mining, and other investment activities.

http://www.minmetals.com/

Country: Beijing

Foundations date: 1950

Type: State-owned

Sector: Industrials

Categories: Mining


China Minmetals’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing:

Emotional: provides access, badge value

Functional: reduces effort, reduces risk, reduces cost, saves time, avoids hassles, organizes, integrates, quality, variety


China Minmetals’s Related Competitors



China Minmetals’s Business Operations


State-owned:

As rivals or subjects of study, Chinese businesses' emergence on the world stage necessitates or creates a new category of business models: state-owned enterprises. These enterprises typically do not exist for profit but rather to offer critical goods and services to society that cannot be supplied economically by established firms. This model is characterized by fixed pricing, monopoly access to consumers, an advantage in exploiting resources, minimal or no tax obligations, and recurring financial losses.

Performance-based contracting:

Performance-based contracting (PBC), sometimes referred to as performance-based logistics (PBL) or performance-based acquisition, is a method for achieving quantifiable supplier performance. A PBC strategy focuses on developing strategic performance measures and the direct correlation of contract payment to success against these criteria. Availability, dependability, maintainability, supportability, and total cost of ownership are all standard criteria. This is accomplished mainly via incentive-based, long-term contracts with precise and quantifiable operational performance targets set by the client and agreed upon by contractual parties.

Guaranteed availability:

Guaranteed availability is a property of a business system that attempts to maintain an agreed-upon level of operational performance, often uptime, for a longer time than is typical. The idea is often linked with terms such as high availability and catastrophe recovery.

From push to pull:

In business, a push-pull system refers to the flow of a product or information between two parties. Customers pull the products or information they need on markets, while offerers or suppliers push them toward them. In logistics and supply chains, stages often operate in both push and pull modes. For example, push production is forecasted demand, while pull production is actual or consumer demand. The push-pull border or decoupling point is the contact between these phases. Wal-Mart is a case of a company that employs a push vs. a pull approach.

Reverse auction:

A reverse auction is a kind of auction in which the bidder and seller take on the roles of each other. In a conventional auction (also referred to as a forward auction), bidders compete for products or services by submitting rising bids. In a reverse auction, vendors fight for the buyer's business, and prices usually fall as sellers underbid one another. A reverse auction is comparable to a unique bid auction. The fundamental concept is the same; nevertheless, a bid auction adheres more closely to the conventional auction structure. For example, each offer is kept private, and only one clear winner is determined after the auction concludes.

Dynamic pricing:

This pattern allows the business to adjust its rates in response to national or regional trends. Dynamic pricing is a pricing technique known as surge pricing, demand pricing, or time-based pricing. In which companies establish variable prices for their goods or services in response to changing market conditions. Companies may adjust their rates based on algorithms that consider rival pricing, supply and demand, and other market variables. Dynamic pricing is widely used in various sectors, including hospitality, travel, entertainment, retail, energy, and public transportation.

Make and distribute:

In this arrangement, the producer creates the product and distributes it to distributors, who oversee the goods' ongoing management in the market.

Solution provider:

A solution provider consolidates all goods and services in a particular domain into a single point of contact. As a result, the client is supplied with a unique know-how to improve efficiency and performance. As a Solution Provider, a business may avoid revenue loss by broadening the scope of the service it offers, which adds value to the product. Additionally, close client interaction enables a better understanding of the customer's habits and requirements, enhancing goods and services.

Supply chain:

A supply chain is a network of companies, people, activities, data, and resources that facilitate the movement of goods and services from supplier to consumer. The supply chain processes natural resources, raw materials, and components into a completed product supplied to the ultimate consumer. In addition, used goods may re-enter the distribution network at any point where residual value is recyclable in advanced supply chain systems. Thus, value chains are connected through supply chains.

Layer player:

Companies that add value across many markets and sectors are referred to be layer players. Occasionally, specialist companies achieve dominance in a specific niche market. The effectiveness of their operations, along with their economies of size and footprint, establish the business as a market leader.

Low touch:

Historically, developing a standard touch sales model for business sales required recruiting and training a Salesforce user who was tasked with the responsibility of generating quality leads, arranging face-to-face meetings, giving presentations, and eventually closing transactions. However, the idea of a low-touch sales strategy is not new; it dates all the way back to the 1980s.

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