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Why Jusda's Business Model is so successful?

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Jusda’s Company Overview


Jusda is a global leader in supply chain management services, providing end-to-end solutions for businesses across various industries. Founded in 2003 as the logistics arm of Foxconn Technology Group, Jusda has grown to become an independent entity, offering services such as transportation management, warehousing, distribution, and supply chain consulting. The company leverages advanced technology, including artificial intelligence and big data analytics, to optimize supply chain processes and deliver value to its clients. Jusda operates in over 50 countries, with a network of partners that enable it to provide seamless and efficient services worldwide. Jusda's business model is centered around providing comprehensive supply chain solutions to its clients. The company operates by integrating various aspects of the supply chain, from sourcing and procurement to logistics and distribution, thereby enabling its clients to focus on their core business. Jusda uses its technological prowess to streamline these processes, resulting in cost savings and increased efficiency for its clients. The company partners with businesses across different sizes and industries, offering customized solutions based on the unique needs and challenges of each client. On the revenue front, Jusda generates income through a variety of channels. The primary source is the fees charged for its supply chain management services, which may be based on a fixed rate or a percentage of the cost savings achieved by the client. Additionally, Jusda earns revenue from its warehousing and distribution services, which includes storage, handling, and transportation charges. The company also offers supply chain consulting services, for which it charges based on the complexity and scope of the project. As Jusda continues to expand its global footprint and enhance its technological capabilities, it is poised to tap into new revenue streams and drive sustainable growth.

https://www.jusdaglobal.com/en

Country: Shanghai

Foundations date: 2005

Type: Subsidiary

Sector: Transportation

Categories: Logistics


Jusda’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: design/aesthetics, provides access

Functional: simplifies, integrates, connects, reduces cost, organizes, reduces risk


Jusda’s Related Competitors



Jusda’s Business Operations


Corporate innovation:

Innovation is the outcome of collaborative creativity in turning an idea into a feasible concept, accompanied by a collaborative effort to bring that concept to life as a product, service, or process improvement. The digital era has created an environment conducive to business model innovation since technology has transformed how businesses operate and provide services to consumers.

Cross-selling:

Cross-selling is a business strategy in which additional services or goods are offered to the primary offering to attract new consumers and retain existing ones. Numerous businesses are increasingly diversifying their product lines with items that have little resemblance to their primary offerings. Walmart is one such example; they used to offer everything but food. They want their stores to function as one-stop shops. Thus, companies mitigate their reliance on particular items and increase overall sustainability by providing other goods and services.

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Customer relationship:

Due to the high cost of client acquisition, acquiring a sizable wallet share, economies of scale are crucial. Customer relationship management (CRM) is a technique for dealing with a business's interactions with current and prospective customers that aims to analyze data about customers' interactions with a company to improve business relationships with customers, with a particular emphasis on retention, and ultimately to drive sales growth.

Data as a Service (DaaS):

Data as a Service (DaaS) is a relative of Software as a Service in computing (SaaS). As with other members of the as a service (aaS) family, DaaS is based on the idea that the product (in this instance, data) may be delivered to the user on-demand independent of the provider's geographic or organizational isolation from the customer. Additionally, with the advent[when?] of service-oriented architecture (SOA), the platform on which the data sits has become unimportant. This progression paved the way for the relatively recent new idea of DaaS to arise.

Demand then made:

Early applications in distribution, production, and buying combined to form the supply chain. However, due to investments in information technology, cost analysis, and process analysis, traditional supply networks have been converted into quicker, cheaper, and more dependable contemporary supply chains. The second side of the value chain is marketing, sales, and service, which generate and maintain demand and are referred to as the market then made.

Digital transformation:

Digitalization is the systematic and accelerated transformation of company operations, processes, skills, and models to fully exploit the changes and possibilities brought about by digital technology and its effect on society. Digital transformation is a journey with many interconnected intermediate objectives, with the ultimate aim of continuous enhancement of processes, divisions, and the business ecosystem in a hyperconnected age. Therefore, establishing the appropriate bridges for the trip is critical to success.

eCommerce:

Electronic commerce, or e-commerce (alternatively spelled eCommerce), is a business model, or a subset of a larger business model, that allows a company or person to do business via an electronic network, usually the internet. As a result, customers gain from increased accessibility and convenience, while the business benefits from integrating sales and distribution with other internal operations. Electronic commerce is prevalent throughout all four main market segments: business to business, business to consumer, consumer to consumer, and consumer to business. Ecommerce may be used to sell almost any goods or service, from books and music to financial services and airline tickets.

Integrator:

A systems integrator is an individual or business specializing in integrating component subsystems into a unified whole and ensuring that those subsystems work correctly together. A process is known as system integration. Gains in efficiency, economies of scope, and less reliance on suppliers result in cost reductions and may improve the stability of value generation.

Lease:

The item that's being sold is now available for rent on an hourly/daily/monthly/yearly basis. A lease is a contract that specifies the terms under which one can rent a property. It ensures the lessee, the tenant, access to an asset, and the lessor, the property owner or landlord, receives monthly payments from the lessee for a predetermined period of months or years. Both the lessee and the lessor risk penalties for breaching the contract's conditions.

Orchestrator:

Orchestrators are businesses that outsource a substantial portion of their operations and processes to third-party service providers or third-party vendors. The fundamental objective of this business strategy is to concentrate internal resources on core and essential functions while contracting out the remainder of the work to other businesses, thus reducing costs.

Supply chain:

A supply chain is a network of companies, people, activities, data, and resources that facilitate the movement of goods and services from supplier to consumer. The supply chain processes natural resources, raw materials, and components into a completed product supplied to the ultimate consumer. In addition, used goods may re-enter the distribution network at any point where residual value is recyclable in advanced supply chain systems. Thus, value chains are connected through supply chains.

Transaction facilitator:

The business acts as an acquirer, processing payments on behalf of online merchants, auction sites, and other commercial users for a fee. This encompasses all elements of purchasing, selling, and exchanging currencies at current or predetermined exchange rates. By far the biggest market in the world in terms of trade volume. The largest multinational banks are the leading players in this industry. Around the globe, financial hubs serve as anchors for trade between a diverse range of various kinds of buyers and sellers 24 hours a day, save on weekends.

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