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Why Masternaut's Business Model is so successful?

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Masternaut’s Company Overview


Masternaut is a pioneer in telematics and vehicle tracking with over two decades of experience. The UK-based company, founded in 1996, combines data from various sources to provide comprehensive insights into vehicle operations and driver behavior. As a trailblazer in the Internet of Things (IoT) space, Masternaut offers advanced telematic solutions that help businesses monitor, analyze, and improve their fleet's performance while significantly reducing operation costs. Known for its innovative software, the company creates effective solutions for businesses of all sizes, from those with a single vehicle to large fleets operating in a wide array of industries, including logistics, retail, construction, and the public sector. Business Model: Masternaut's business model is centered on providing telematics solutions to businesses to maximize efficiency and cut operating costs. Their suite of products includes vehicle tracking devices, mobile workforce apps, and advanced data analytics. The company continually innovates and invests in research and development, resulting in intelligent telematics technologies that improve fuel consumption, ensure driver safety, and boost productivity. These solutions are typically sold as a "Software as a Service" (SaaS) subscription, with clients having the option to customize the offering based on their specific business needs. Revenue Model: The primary source of Masternaut's revenue is the subscription fees charged to businesses for using their software and telematics services. They offer various pricing models depending on the fleet size, the complexity of the services required, and the subscription duration. Additionally, Masternaut also generates income from the sale of hardware required for vehicle tracking, and add-ons like in-cab coaching devices and fuel card integrations. They are also investing in future growth areas like connected car services and data monetization, where they could generate revenue by selling aggregated and anonymized data to third parties for traffic analysis, urban planning, and insurance purposes.

https://www.masternaut.com/

Masternaut’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: design/aesthetics, provides access

Functional: saves time, simplifies, reduces risk, integrates, connects, reduces effort, reduces cost, informs


Masternaut’s Related Competitors



Masternaut’s Business Operations


Add-on:

An additional item offered to a customer of a primary product or service is referred to as an add-on sale. Depending on the industry, add-on sales may generate substantial income and profits for a firm. For example, when a customer has decided to purchase the core product or service, the salesman at an automotive dealership will usually offer an add-on sale. The pattern is used in the price of new software programs based on access to new features, number of users, and so forth.

Best in class services:

When a firm brings a product to market, it must first create a compelling product and then field a workforce capable of manufacturing it at a competitive price. Neither task is simple to perform effectively; much managerial effort and scholarly study have been dedicated to these issues. Nevertheless, providing a service involves another aspect: managing clients, who are consumers of the service and may also contribute to its creation.

Combining data within and across industries:

How can data from other sources be integrated to generate additional value? The science of big data, combined with emerging IT standards that enable improved data integration, enables new information coordination across businesses or sectors. As a result, intelligent executives across industries will see big data for what it is: a revolution in management. However, as with any other significant organizational transformation, the difficulties associated with becoming a big data-enabled company may be tremendous and require hands-on?or, in some instances, hands-off?leadership.

Customer data:

It primarily offers free services to users, stores their personal information, and acts as a platform for users to interact with one another. Additional value is generated by gathering and processing consumer data in advantageous ways for internal use or transfer to interested third parties. Revenue is produced by either directly selling the data to outsiders or by leveraging it for internal reasons, such as increasing the efficacy of advertising. Thus, innovative, sustainable Big Data business models are as prevalent and desired as they are elusive (i.e., data is the new oil).

Data as a Service (DaaS):

Data as a Service (DaaS) is a relative of Software as a Service in computing (SaaS). As with other members of the as a service (aaS) family, DaaS is based on the idea that the product (in this instance, data) may be delivered to the user on-demand independent of the provider's geographic or organizational isolation from the customer. Additionally, with the advent[when?] of service-oriented architecture (SOA), the platform on which the data sits has become unimportant. This progression paved the way for the relatively recent new idea of DaaS to arise.

Performance-based contracting:

Performance-based contracting (PBC), sometimes referred to as performance-based logistics (PBL) or performance-based acquisition, is a method for achieving quantifiable supplier performance. A PBC strategy focuses on developing strategic performance measures and the direct correlation of contract payment to success against these criteria. Availability, dependability, maintainability, supportability, and total cost of ownership are all standard criteria. This is accomplished mainly via incentive-based, long-term contracts with precise and quantifiable operational performance targets set by the client and agreed upon by contractual parties.

Software as a Service (SaaS):

Software as a Service (SaaS) is a paradigm for licensing and delivering subscription-based and centrally hosted software. Occasionally, the term on-demand software is used. SaaS is usually accessible through a web browser via a thin client. SaaS has established itself as the de facto delivery mechanism for a large number of commercial apps. SaaS has been integrated into virtually every major enterprise Software company's strategy.

Software value token:

Another kind of crowdsourcing is to raise money for a project in exchange for a digital or software-based value token. Value tokens are generated endogenously by specific open, decentralized networks and are used to encourage network client computers to spend limited computer resources on network maintenance. These value tokens may or may not exist at the time of the crowd sale, and they may need significant development work and ultimate software release before becoming life and establishing a market value. While funds may be collected only for the value token, money obtained via blockchain-based crowdfunding can also represent stock, bonds, or even market-maker seats of governance for the company being financed.

Solution provider:

A solution provider consolidates all goods and services in a particular domain into a single point of contact. As a result, the client is supplied with a unique know-how to improve efficiency and performance. As a Solution Provider, a business may avoid revenue loss by broadening the scope of the service it offers, which adds value to the product. Additionally, close client interaction enables a better understanding of the customer's habits and requirements, enhancing goods and services.

Subscription:

Subscription business models are built on the concept of providing a product or service in exchange for recurring subscription income on a monthly or annual basis. As a result, they place a higher premium on client retention than on customer acquisition. Subscription business models, in essence, concentrate on revenue generation in such a manner that a single client makes repeated payments for extended access to a product or service. Cable television, internet providers, software suppliers, websites (e.g., blogs), business solutions providers, and financial services companies utilize this approach, as do conventional newspapers, periodicals, and academic publications.

Transportation as a Service (TaaS):

Transportation as a Service (TaaS), also referred to as Mobility as a Service (MaaS), refers to a trend away from privately owned means of transportation and toward subscription-based mobility solutions. This is accomplished by integrating transportation services from public and private suppliers through a unified gateway that organizes and maintains the journey, which customers may pay for with a single account. Users may either pay per journey or subscribe to a monthly subscription for a certain distance.

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