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One World Everybody Eats’s Business Strategy Case Study

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One World Everybody Eats’s Company Overview


One World Everybody Eats (OWEE) is a nonprofit community kitchen and foundation, originally based in Salt Lake City, Utah. Its motto is "a hand up, not a handout." The community kitchen concept is a restaurant based on a gift economy, allowing patrons to "pay what they can" and serving all members of the community regardless of their ability to pay. The Cafe incorporates volunteer and common effort aspects similar to those of a community garden. The organization believes in providing all who eat high quality, all natural, simple food and asks patrons to give fairly in exchange so that everyone can partake.

http://www.oneworldeverybodyeats.org/

Country: Utah

Foundations date: 2006

Type: Nonprofit

Sector: Consumer Goods

Categories: Food & Beverages


One World Everybody Eats’s Customer Needs


Social impact: self-transcendence

Life changing: provides hope, self-actualization, affiliation/belonging

Emotional: rewards me, wellness, provides access

Functional: connects, sensory appeal, variety, quality


One World Everybody Eats’s Related Competitors


Sysco FoodNow PepsiCo Mondelez International Tyson Foods WH Group

One World Everybody Eats’s Business Operations


Barter:

Without currency, it is a kind of trading in which products or services are traded. Typically used during periods of high inflation or scarcity of money, barter has become a popular method of negotiating agreements such as offers to purchase excess products in return for advertising space or time. With the introduction of the internet, bartering shifted from a largely person-to-person transaction to a primarily business-to-business one, where every day, commodities ranging from manufacturing capacity to steel and paper are bartered across international boundaries.

Membership club:

Belonging to a group, either individually or collectively. Certain memberships may charge a fee to join or participate, while others are free. Others have particular skill criteria that must be met before membership is granted. Members are entitled to specific benefits or advantages, but not all members may enjoy the same rights and privileges. Another method is taken by a members-only luxury lifestyle management business that offers concierge services such as vacation reservations, restaurant suggestions, and event access.

Nonprofit organization:

The nonprofit world rarely engages in equally clear and succinct conversations about an organization’s long-term funding strategy. It works on funds and provides services to the user free of cost. That is because the different types of funding that fuel nonprofits have never been clearly defined. A nonprofit organization is often dedicated to furthering a particular social cause or advocating for a particular point of view. In economic terms, a nonprofit organization uses its surplus revenues to further achieve its purpose or mission, rather than distributing its surplus income to the organization's shareholders (or equivalents) as profit or dividends.

Pay what you want:

Pay what you want is a pricing approach in which purchasers determine the value of a service or a product. Allowing customers to pay whatever they want may benefit certain circumstances since it removes a slew of drawbacks associated with traditional pricing. For example, permission to pay whatever they want attracts buyers for a variety of reasons, including eliminating the worry of whether a product is worth a fixed price and the associated danger of disappointment (buyer's remorse). For sellers, this eliminates the time-consuming and often expensive process of establishing the correct pricing (which may vary for different market segments).

Why One World Everybody Eats’s Business Model is so successful?

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