This web app uses cookies to compile statistic information of our users visits. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. If you wish you may change your preference or read about cookies

close

Why Shein's Business Model is so successful?

Get all the answers


Shein’s Company Overview


Shein is a leading international online fashion retail platform that offers trendy women's wear, men's apparel, children's clothes, accessories, shoes, bags, and other fashion items. Founded in 2008, the company is dedicated to providing high-quality products at affordable prices to shoppers around the globe. With a business operation that spans more than 220 countries and regions worldwide, Shein prides itself on staying on top of the latest fashion trends while rapidly bringing these styles to market. The company's commitment to quality, value, and service has made it a preferred choice for fashion-forward consumers. Business Model: Shein operates on a B2C (Business to Consumer) e-commerce model. The company's strategy revolves around sourcing products from a network of trusted manufacturers, which allows it to offer a wide range of trendy fashion items at competitive prices. The shopping process is conducted online via Shein's website or mobile app, enabling customers from various locations to browse and purchase items easily. Additionally, Shein strongly emphasizes customer service and satisfaction, investing heavily in user-friendly website design, secure payment processes, efficient logistics, and responsive customer support. Revenue Model: The primary source of Shein's revenue is the sale of its products. The company operates on a retail e-commerce revenue model, where customers pay for the products they purchase through the platform. The pricing of the products is strategically done to ensure affordability while maintaining a profit margin. Revenue is also generated through shipping fees, although Shein often offers free shipping on orders above a certain amount to incentivize larger purchases. Additionally, Shein has an affiliate program where influencers and bloggers can earn a commission by promoting Shein's products, indirectly contributing to the company's revenue by driving additional sales.

https://us.shein.com/

Country: China

Foundations date: 2008

Type: Private

Sector: Consumer Goods

Categories: eCommerce


Shein’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: design/aesthetics, attractiveness, provides access

Functional: quality, variety, informs


Shein’s Related Competitors



Shein’s Business Operations


Curated retail:

Curated retail guarantees focused shopping and product relevance; it presents a consumer with the most appropriate options based on past purchases, interactions, and established preferences. It may be provided via human guidance, algorithmic recommendations, or a combination of the two.

Cross-selling:

Cross-selling is a business strategy in which additional services or goods are offered to the primary offering to attract new consumers and retain existing ones. Numerous businesses are increasingly diversifying their product lines with items that have little resemblance to their primary offerings. Walmart is one such example; they used to offer everything but food. They want their stores to function as one-stop shops. Thus, companies mitigate their reliance on particular items and increase overall sustainability by providing other goods and services.

Advertising:

This approach generated money by sending promotional marketing messages from other businesses to customers. When you establish a for-profit company, one of the most critical aspects of your strategy is determining how to generate income. Many companies sell either products or services or a mix of the two. However, advertisers are frequently the source of the majority of all of the revenue for online businesses and media organizations. This is referred to as an ad-based income model.

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Digital:

A digital strategy is a strategic management and a business reaction or solution to a digital issue, which is often best handled as part of a broader company plan. A digital strategy is frequently defined by the application of new technologies to existing business activities and a focus on enabling new digital skills for their company (such as those formed by the Information Age and frequently as a result of advances in digital technologies such as computers, data, telecommunication services, and the World wide web, to name a few).

Direct selling:

Direct selling refers to a situation in which a company's goods are immediately accessible from the manufacturer or service provider rather than via intermediate channels. The business avoids the retail margin and any extra expenses connected with the intermediaries in this manner. These savings may be passed on to the client, establishing a consistent sales experience. Furthermore, such intimate touch may help to strengthen client connections. Finally, direct selling benefits consumers by providing convenience and service, such as personal demonstrations and explanations of goods, home delivery, and substantial satisfaction guarantees.

Low cost:

A pricing strategy in which a business provides a low price in order to drive demand and increase market share. Additionally referred to as a low-price approach. The low-cost model has sparked a revolution in the airline industry. The end-user benefits from low-cost tickets as a result of a revenue strategy that seeks various sources of income. Ryanair was one of the first businesses to embrace this approach.

Membership club:

Belonging to a group, either individually or collectively. Certain memberships may charge a fee to join or participate, while others are free. Others have particular skill criteria that must be met before membership is granted. Members are entitled to specific benefits or advantages, but not all members may enjoy the same rights and privileges. Another method is taken by a members-only luxury lifestyle management business that offers concierge services such as vacation reservations, restaurant suggestions, and event access.

Market research:

Market research is any systematic attempt to collect data about target markets or consumers. It is a critical aspect of corporate strategy. While the terms marketing research and market research are frequently used interchangeably, experienced practitioners may want to distinguish between the two, noting that marketing research is concerned with marketing processes. In contrast, market research is concerned with markets. Market research is a critical component of sustaining a competitive edge over rivals.

Dynamic pricing:

This pattern allows the business to adjust its rates in response to national or regional trends. Dynamic pricing is a pricing technique known as surge pricing, demand pricing, or time-based pricing. In which companies establish variable prices for their goods or services in response to changing market conditions. Companies may adjust their rates based on algorithms that consider rival pricing, supply and demand, and other market variables. Dynamic pricing is widely used in various sectors, including hospitality, travel, entertainment, retail, energy, and public transportation.

Fast fashion:

Fast fashion is a phrase fashion retailers use to describe how designs travel rapidly from the catwalk to catch current fashion trends. The emphasis is on optimizing specific supply chain components to enable these trends to be developed and produced quickly and affordably, allowing the mainstream customer to purchase current apparel designs at a reduced price.

Online marketplace:

An online marketplace (or online e-commerce marketplace) is a kind of e-commerce website in which product or service information is supplied by various third parties or, in some instances, the brand itself, while the marketplace operator handles transactions. Additionally, this pattern encompasses peer-to-peer (P2P) e-commerce between businesses or people. By and large, since marketplaces aggregate goods from a diverse range of suppliers, the variety and availability are typically greater than in vendor-specific online retail shops. Additionally, pricing might be more competitive.

eCommerce:

Electronic commerce, or e-commerce (alternatively spelled eCommerce), is a business model, or a subset of a larger business model, that allows a company or person to do business via an electronic network, usually the internet. As a result, customers gain from increased accessibility and convenience, while the business benefits from integrating sales and distribution with other internal operations. Electronic commerce is prevalent throughout all four main market segments: business to business, business to consumer, consumer to consumer, and consumer to business. Ecommerce may be used to sell almost any goods or service, from books and music to financial services and airline tickets.

Tiered service:

Users may choose from a limited number of levels with gradually rising price points to get the product or goods that are most appropriate for their requirements. Such systems are widely used in the telecommunications industry, particularly in the areas of cellular service, digital and cable television, and broadband internet access. Users may choose from a limited number of levels with gradually rising price points to get the product or goods that are most appropriate for their requirements.

Group buying:

Group purchasing, also referred to as collective buying, provides goods and services at substantially discounted rates in exchange for a minimum number of customers. Typically, these websites offer a discount of the day, which becomes active after a certain amount of individuals agree to purchase the goods or service. In addition, numerous group purchasing sites operate by arranging discounts with local businesses and increasing foot traffic in return for lower pricing.

Mass customization:

Mass customization is a strategy that entails using modular goods and manufacturing processes to allow efficient product individualization. Mass customization refers to producing customized output using flexible computer-aided manufacturing systems in marketing, manufacturing, contact centers, and management. Mass customization is the next frontier for manufacturing and service sectors alike. Beyond the physical product, mass customization is utilized by a diverse variety of software products and services with the goal of developing strong connections with customers via personalization and suggestion.

Embed code:

x
Copy the code below and embed it in yours to show this business model canvas in your website.