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Why Somfy's Business Model is so successful?

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Somfy’s Company Overview


Somfy is a globally recognized company that specializes in the automation of openings and closures in homes and buildings. Established in 1969 in Cluses, France, Somfy has grown to be a leader in the home automation industry, offering a wide range of products including motorized systems for blinds, curtains, gates, garage doors, and home security systems. The company is committed to creating smart solutions that promote better living and foster well-being. Somfy’s products are designed to deliver convenience, comfort, and security to its customers, emphasizing energy efficiency and environmental sustainability. Somfy's business model is centered around the development, production, and distribution of a comprehensive range of motors, controls, and sensors for smart homes and buildings. The company invests heavily in research and development to ensure they stay at the forefront of innovation. They operate through a network of professional dealers, installers, and integrators, ensuring their products are properly implemented and serviced. This model allows them to maintain a close relationship with their customers, providing high-quality after-sales service and support. The revenue model of Somfy is primarily based on the sales of their wide array of home automation products. They generate income through direct sales to consumers, as well as through partnerships with professional dealers and installers. Additionally, Somfy also offers premium services such as extended warranties and maintenance contracts, providing a steady stream of recurring revenue. The company also benefits from the sales of replacement parts and upgrades, ensuring customers can keep their systems up to date and functioning optimally. Through these multiple revenue streams, Somfy has established a robust and sustainable business model.

https://www.somfy.com/fr-fr/

Country: France

Foundations date: 1969

Type: Private

Sector: Consumer Goods

Categories: Electronics


Somfy’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: design/aesthetics, provides access

Functional: simplifies, integrates, connects, quality, variety


Somfy’s Related Competitors



Somfy’s Business Operations


Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Customer relationship:

Due to the high cost of client acquisition, acquiring a sizable wallet share, economies of scale are crucial. Customer relationship management (CRM) is a technique for dealing with a business's interactions with current and prospective customers that aims to analyze data about customers' interactions with a company to improve business relationships with customers, with a particular emphasis on retention, and ultimately to drive sales growth.

Digital transformation:

Digitalization is the systematic and accelerated transformation of company operations, processes, skills, and models to fully exploit the changes and possibilities brought about by digital technology and its effect on society. Digital transformation is a journey with many interconnected intermediate objectives, with the ultimate aim of continuous enhancement of processes, divisions, and the business ecosystem in a hyperconnected age. Therefore, establishing the appropriate bridges for the trip is critical to success.

eCommerce:

Electronic commerce, or e-commerce (alternatively spelled eCommerce), is a business model, or a subset of a larger business model, that allows a company or person to do business via an electronic network, usually the internet. As a result, customers gain from increased accessibility and convenience, while the business benefits from integrating sales and distribution with other internal operations. Electronic commerce is prevalent throughout all four main market segments: business to business, business to consumer, consumer to consumer, and consumer to business. Ecommerce may be used to sell almost any goods or service, from books and music to financial services and airline tickets.

Ecosystem:

A business ecosystem is a collection of related entities ? suppliers, distributors, customers, rivals, and government agencies ? collaborating and providing a particular product or service. The concept is that each entity in the ecosystem influences and is impacted by the others, resulting in an ever-changing connection. Therefore, each entity must be adaptive and flexible to live, much like a biological ecosystem. These connections are often backed by a shared technical platform and are based on the flow of information, resources, and artifacts in the software ecosystem.

Experience selling:

An experience in the sales model describes how a typical user perceives or comprehends a system's operation. A product or service's value is enhanced when an extra customer experience is included. Visual representations of experience models are abstract diagrams or metaphors derived from recognizable objects, actions, or systems. User interfaces use a range of experience models to help users rapidly comprehend what is occurring in the design, where they are, and what they may do next. For example, a software experience model may depict the connection between two applications and the relationship between an application and different navigation methods and other system or software components.

Licensing:

A formal agreement in which the owner of the copyright, know-how, patent, service mark, trademark, or other intellectual property grants a licensee the right to use, manufacture, and sell copies of the original. These agreements often restrict the licensee's scope or area of operation, define whether the license is exclusive or non-exclusive, and stipulate whether the licensee will pay royalties or another kind of compensation in return. While licensing agreements are often used to commercialize the technology, franchisees also utilize them to encourage the sale of products and services.

Niche retail:

A marketing strategy for a product or service includes characteristics that appeal to a particular minority market segment. A typical niche product will be distinguishable from other goods and manufactured and sold for specialized purposes within its associated niche market. Niche retail has focused on direct-to-consumer and direct-to-business internet sales channels. The slogan for niche retail is Everything except the brand.

Product innovation:

Product innovation is the process of developing and introducing a new or better version of an existing product or service. This is a broader definition of innovation than the generally recognized definition, which includes creating new goods that are considered innovative in this context. For example, Apple launched a succession of successful new products and services in 2001?the iPod, the iTunes online music service, and the iPhone?which catapulted the firm to the top of its industry.

Solution provider:

A solution provider consolidates all goods and services in a particular domain into a single point of contact. As a result, the client is supplied with a unique know-how to improve efficiency and performance. As a Solution Provider, a business may avoid revenue loss by broadening the scope of the service it offers, which adds value to the product. Additionally, close client interaction enables a better understanding of the customer's habits and requirements, enhancing goods and services.

Subscription:

Subscription business models are built on the concept of providing a product or service in exchange for recurring subscription income on a monthly or annual basis. As a result, they place a higher premium on client retention than on customer acquisition. Subscription business models, in essence, concentrate on revenue generation in such a manner that a single client makes repeated payments for extended access to a product or service. Cable television, internet providers, software suppliers, websites (e.g., blogs), business solutions providers, and financial services companies utilize this approach, as do conventional newspapers, periodicals, and academic publications.

Technology trends:

New technologies that are now being created or produced in the next five to ten years will significantly change the economic and social landscape. These include but are not limited to information technology, wireless data transmission, human-machine connection, on-demand printing, biotechnology, and sophisticated robotics.

Trash to cash:

Trash to cash may be an extremely profitable business strategy. It entails collecting old goods and repurposing them or reselling them to other areas of the globe. It may be very lucrative for two reasons. The first reason is that most of these goods can be obtained for little or no money, dramatically boosting the profit margin. Furthermore, companies pay to have their garbage collected, which may be a lucrative revenue stream. It may be a double whammy for a business that is compensated to remove debris.

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