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Why Wallapop's Business Model is so successful?

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Wallapop’s Company Overview


Wallapop is a leading, second-hand marketplace that facilitates buying and selling of used goods within local communities. Founded in 2013 and headquartered in Barcelona, Spain, Wallapop is committed to providing a sustainable and convenient way to shop, while promoting circular economy. The platform offers diverse categories of items, ranging from electronics, fashion, furniture, to cars and real estate, making it a one-stop-shop for customers looking for affordable, pre-loved items. The company's mobile-first approach and user-friendly interface have contributed to its growing popularity and user base, which now extends beyond Spain to other parts of the world including the US and UK. Business Model: Wallapop operates on a C2C (Consumer-to-Consumer) business model, connecting individuals who want to sell their used items with those who wish to buy them. The platform is free to use for both buyers and sellers, and it focuses on local transactions, encouraging users to meet in person for the exchange of goods. This model not only promotes sustainability by reducing shipping and packaging needs but also fosters community interaction and trust. Wallapop also provides a delivery service for users who prefer it, handling the logistics of shipping for a fee. Revenue Model: Wallapop's primary revenue stream comes from its freemium model. While listing and selling items is free, the platform offers premium services for a fee. These include 'Bump Up' feature which allows sellers to move their listings to the top of the search results, and 'Spotlight' feature which highlights a specific listing on the homepage for increased visibility. Additionally, Wallapop charges a commission fee for items sold through their delivery service. The company also monetizes through in-app advertisements, partnering with businesses to display their ads to Wallapop's large user base.

https://es.wallapop.com/

Country: Spain

Foundations date: 2013

Type: Private

Sector: Consumer Services

Categories: Internet


Wallapop’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: design/aesthetics, fun/entertainment, provides access

Functional: simplifies, makes money, connects, variety, informs


Wallapop’s Related Competitors



Wallapop’s Business Operations


Channel aggregation:

Consolidating numerous distribution routes into one to achieve greater economic efficiency. A business model for internet commerce in which a company (that does not manufacture or warehouse any item) gathers (aggregates) information about products and services from many competing sources and displays it on its website. The firm's strength is in its power to create an 'environment' that attracts users to its website and develop a system that facilitates pricing and specification matching.

Classified advertising:

Classified advertising is most prevalent in newspapers, online publications, and other periodicals that may be sold or given for free. As a result, classified ads are much less expensive than more prominent display ads companies use, even though advertisements are more prevalent.

Advertising:

This approach generated money by sending promotional marketing messages from other businesses to customers. When you establish a for-profit company, one of the most critical aspects of your strategy is determining how to generate income. Many companies sell either products or services or a mix of the two. However, advertisers are frequently the source of the majority of all of the revenue for online businesses and media organizations. This is referred to as an ad-based income model.

Customer relationship:

Due to the high cost of client acquisition, acquiring a sizable wallet share, economies of scale are crucial. Customer relationship management (CRM) is a technique for dealing with a business's interactions with current and prospective customers that aims to analyze data about customers' interactions with a company to improve business relationships with customers, with a particular emphasis on retention, and ultimately to drive sales growth.

Collaborative consumption:

Collaborative Consumption (CC) may be described as a collection of resource circulation systems that allow consumers to both get and supply valued resources or services, either temporarily or permanently, via direct contact with other customers or through the use of a mediator.

Crowdsourcing:

Crowdsourcing is a kind of sourcing in which people or organizations solicit donations from Internet users to acquire required services or ideas. Crowdsourcing differs from outsourcing because work may originate from an undefined public (rather than being commissioned from a particular, identified organization). In addition, those crowdsourcing procedures are a combination of bottom-up and top-down. The benefits of crowdsourcing may include reduced prices, increased speed, better quality, increased flexibility, scalability, and variety. An anonymous crowd adopts a solution to a task or issue, usually through the internet. Contributors are compensated or have the opportunity to win a prize if their answer is selected for manufacturing or sale. Customer engagement and inclusion may help build a good rapport with them, resulting in increased sales and income.

Digital:

A digital strategy is a strategic management and a business reaction or solution to a digital issue, which is often best handled as part of a broader company plan. A digital strategy is frequently defined by the application of new technologies to existing business activities and a focus on enabling new digital skills for their company (such as those formed by the Information Age and frequently as a result of advances in digital technologies such as computers, data, telecommunication services, and the World wide web, to name a few).

Freemium:

Freemium is the sum of the words free and premium and refers to a business strategy that provides both free and premium services. The freemium business model works by providing essential services for free and charging for enhanced or extra capabilities. This is a typical practice among many software firms, who offer imperative software for free with restricted functionality, and it is also a popular approach among game developers. While everyone is invited to play the game for free, extra lives and unique game features are accessible only once the player buys.

Make more of It:

The business invests time and money in developing in-house expertise and development that may be used both internally and outside to sell goods or services to clients or third parties. AWS was created to meet Amazon's cloud computing requirements. They quickly discovered that they could offer their services to end-users. At the moment, AWS accounts for about 11% of Amazon's overall income.

Reputation builders:

Reputation builders is an innovative software platform that enables companies to create, collect, and manage positive internet reviews. It was a pioneer in the utilization of user-generated material. The website services are provided for free to users, who supply the majority of the content, and the websites of related businesses are monetized via advertising.

Trash to cash:

Trash to cash may be an extremely profitable business strategy. It entails collecting old goods and repurposing them or reselling them to other areas of the globe. It may be very lucrative for two reasons. The first reason is that most of these goods can be obtained for little or no money, dramatically boosting the profit margin. Furthermore, companies pay to have their garbage collected, which may be a lucrative revenue stream. It may be a double whammy for a business that is compensated to remove debris.

Mobile first behavior:

It is intended to mean that as a company thinks about its website or its other digital means of communications, it should be thinking critically about the mobile experience and how customers and employees will interact with it from their many devices. The term is “mobile first,” and it is intended to mean that as a company thinks about its website or its other digital means of communications, it should be thinking critically about the mobile experience and how customers and employees will interact with it from their many devices.

Long tail:

The long tail is a strategy that allows businesses to realize significant profit out of selling low volumes of hard-to-find items to many customers instead of only selling large volumes of a reduced number of popular items. The term was coined in 2004 by Chris Anderson, who argued that products in low demand or with low sales volume can collectively make up market share that rivals or exceeds the relatively few current bestsellers and blockbusters but only if the store or distribution channel is large enough.

Sharing economy:

The sharing economy eliminates the necessity for individual asset ownership. The phrase sharing economy is an umbrella word that encompasses various definitions and is often used to refer to economic and social activity that involves online transactions. Originally coined by the open-source community to refer to peer-to-peer sharing of access to goods and services, the term is now occasionally used more broadly to refer to any sales transaction conducted via online marketplaces, including those that are business to consumer (B2C) than peer-to-peer.

Featured listings:

A highlighted listing is more important and noticeable than a regular listing, providing maximum exposure for your workplace to consumers searching in your region. In addition, customers are attracted to these premium listings because they include more pictures of your home ? and its excellent location.

Network builders:

This pattern is used to connecting individuals. It offers essential services for free but charges for extra services. The network effect is a paradox that occurs when more people utilize a product or service, the more valuable it becomes.

Online marketplace:

An online marketplace (or online e-commerce marketplace) is a kind of e-commerce website in which product or service information is supplied by various third parties or, in some instances, the brand itself, while the marketplace operator handles transactions. Additionally, this pattern encompasses peer-to-peer (P2P) e-commerce between businesses or people. By and large, since marketplaces aggregate goods from a diverse range of suppliers, the variety and availability are typically greater than in vendor-specific online retail shops. Additionally, pricing might be more competitive.

Peer to Peer (P2P):

A peer-to-peer, or P2P, service is a decentralized platform that enables two people to communicate directly, without the need for a third-party intermediary or the usage of a corporation providing a product or service. For example, the buyer and seller do business now via the P2P service. Certain peer-to-peer (P2P) services do not include economic transactions such as buying and selling but instead connect people to collaborate on projects, exchange information, and communicate without the need for an intermediary. The organizing business provides a point of contact for these people, often an online database and communication service. The renting of personal goods, the supply of particular products or services, or the exchange of knowledge and experiences are all examples of transactions.

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