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Beauty'in’s Business Strategy Case Study

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Beauty'in’s Company Overview


Beauty’in presents a new scientifically proven beauty from within concept. Each Beauty’in product supplements and boosts the body’s essential nutrients to improve health and enhance beauty, with no added sugar, preservatives or trans fat. All the products combine vitamins, minerals, organic fruits extracts and also contain hydrolyzed collagen, one of the biggest protein molecules in the human body responsible for building fibers and giving firmness and elasticity to the skin. Beauty’in range may be enjoyed anytime and anywhere; at work, at home or the gym.

www.beautyin.com

Country: Brazil

Foundations date: 2000

Type: Private

Sector: Consumer Goods

Categories: Beauty


Beauty'in’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing:

Emotional: wellness, therapeutic value, design/aesthetics

Functional: quality, sensory appeal, variety


Beauty'in’s Related Competitors


Glam Beauty Bar Birchbox Styleseat Treatwell Mary Kay Confidente

Beauty'in’s Business Operations


Cross-selling:

Cross-selling is a business strategy in which additional services or goods are offered to the primary offering to attract new consumers and retain existing ones. Numerous businesses are increasingly diversifying their product lines with items that have little resemblance to their primary offerings. Walmart is one such example; they used to offer everything but food. They want their stores to function as one-stop shops. Thus, companies mitigate their reliance on particular items and increase overall sustainability by providing other goods and services.

Channel per purpose:

Creating separate channels for selling and purchasing current goods and services. A marketing plan is a vendor's plan for distributing a product or service to the end consumer through the chain of commerce. Manufacturers and retailers have a plethora of channel choices. The simplest method is the direct channel, which involves the seller selling directly to the consumer. In addition, the vendor may use its own sales staff or offer its goods or services through an e-commerce website.

Digital:

A digital strategy is a strategic management and a business reaction or solution to a digital issue, which is often best handled as part of a broader company plan. A digital strategy is frequently defined by the application of new technologies to existing business activities and a focus on enabling new digital skills for their company (such as those formed by the Information Age and frequently as a result of advances in digital technologies such as computers, data, telecommunication services, and the World wide web, to name a few).

eCommerce:

Electronic commerce, or e-commerce (alternatively spelled eCommerce), is a business model, or a subset of a larger business model, that allows a company or person to do business via an electronic network, usually the internet. As a result, customers gain from increased accessibility and convenience, while the business benefits from integrating sales and distribution with other internal operations. Electronic commerce is prevalent throughout all four main market segments: business to business, business to consumer, consumer to consumer, and consumer to business. Ecommerce may be used to sell almost any goods or service, from books and music to financial services and airline tickets.

Supermarket:

A supermarket is a self-service store arranged into aisles and has many foods and home goods. It is bigger and has a greater variety than traditional grocery shops but is smaller and offers a more limited selection than a hypermarket or big-box market. Supermarkets are usually chain shops supplied by their parent firms' distribution centers, allowing for more significant economies of scale. In addition, supermarkets often provide items at competitive rates by using their purchasing power to negotiate lower pricing from producers than smaller shops can.

Sustainability-focused:

Companies that manufacture fast-moving consumer goods and services and are committed to sustainability do ecological impact assessments on their products and services. While research-based green marketing needs facts, green storytelling requires imagination and location. Employees responsible for the brand definition and green marketers collaborate with product and service designers, environmental groups, and government agencies.

Why Beauty'in’s Business Model is so successful?

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