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COFCO’s Business Strategy Case Study

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COFCO’s Company Overview


COFCO, full name China National Cereals, Oils and Foodstuffs Corporation, is one of China's State-owned food processing holding companies. COFCO Group is China's largest food processing, manufacturer, and trader. Founded in 1952, it is one of the largest SOEs of the 49 directly administrated by China's State Council. Between 1952 and 1987, it was the sole agricultural products importer and exporter operating under direct control of the central government. In 2007, COFCO had just over 60.000 employees in multiple locations in China as well as overseas operations in countries such as the US, UK, Japan, Australia, and Canada.

www.cofco.com

Country: Beijing

Foundations date: 1949

Type: State-owned

Sector: Industrials

Categories: Agriculture


COFCO’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing:

Emotional: provides access

Functional: integrates, connects, quality, variety, organizes


COFCO’s Related Competitors


Wilmar International Bunge Monsanto ADM FBN Blue River Technology

COFCO’s Business Operations


Agribusiness:

Agribusiness is the manufacturing of agricultural products. Agrichemicals, breeding, crop production (and contract farming), distribution, farm equipment, processing, seed supply, and marketing and retail sales. Thus, the agribusiness system includes all food and fiber value chain agents and the institutions that affect it. The term agribusiness is simply a combination of agriculture and business within the agricultural sector, alluding to the wide variety of activities and disciplines that contemporary food production encompasses.

Archetypes of business model design:

The business model archetypes include many business personalities and more than one business model linked to various goods or services. There is a common foundation behind the scenes of each unit, but from a management standpoint, each group may operate independently.

Brands consortium:

A collection of brands that coexist under the auspices of a parent business. The businesses in this pattern develop, produce, and market equipment. Their strength is in copywriting. Occasionally used to refer to a short-term agreement in which many companies (from the same or other industrial sectors or countries) combine their financial and personnel resources to execute a significant project benefiting all group members.

Cross-subsidiary:

When products and goods and products and services are integrated, they form a subsidiary side and a money side, maximizing the overall revenue impact. A subsidiary is a firm owned entirely or in part by another business, referred to as the parent company or holding company. A parent company with subsidiaries is a kind of conglomerate, a corporation that consists of several distinct companies; sometimes, the national or worldwide dispersion of the offices necessitates the establishment of subsidiaries.

Decomposition:

Simplifying many product kinds inside a product group or set of goods. A technique for doing business analysis in which a complex business process is dissected to reveal its constituent parts. Functional decomposition is a technique that may be used to contribute to an understanding and management of large and complicated processes and assist in issue solving. Additionally, functional decomposition is utilized in computer engineering to aid in the creation of software.

Integrator:

A systems integrator is an individual or business specializing in integrating component subsystems into a unified whole and ensuring that those subsystems work correctly together. A process is known as system integration. Gains in efficiency, economies of scope, and less reliance on suppliers result in cost reductions and may improve the stability of value generation.

Long tail:

The long tail is a strategy that allows businesses to realize significant profit out of selling low volumes of hard-to-find items to many customers instead of only selling large volumes of a reduced number of popular items. The term was coined in 2004 by Chris Anderson, who argued that products in low demand or with low sales volume can collectively make up market share that rivals or exceeds the relatively few current bestsellers and blockbusters but only if the store or distribution channel is large enough.

Low touch:

Historically, developing a standard touch sales model for business sales required recruiting and training a Salesforce user who was tasked with the responsibility of generating quality leads, arranging face-to-face meetings, giving presentations, and eventually closing transactions. However, the idea of a low-touch sales strategy is not new; it dates all the way back to the 1980s.

Make and distribute:

In this arrangement, the producer creates the product and distributes it to distributors, who oversee the goods' ongoing management in the market.

Orchestrator:

Orchestrators are businesses that outsource a substantial portion of their operations and processes to third-party service providers or third-party vendors. The fundamental objective of this business strategy is to concentrate internal resources on core and essential functions while contracting out the remainder of the work to other businesses, thus reducing costs.

Solution provider:

A solution provider consolidates all goods and services in a particular domain into a single point of contact. As a result, the client is supplied with a unique know-how to improve efficiency and performance. As a Solution Provider, a business may avoid revenue loss by broadening the scope of the service it offers, which adds value to the product. Additionally, close client interaction enables a better understanding of the customer's habits and requirements, enhancing goods and services.

State-owned:

As rivals or subjects of study, Chinese businesses' emergence on the world stage necessitates or creates a new category of business models: state-owned enterprises. These enterprises typically do not exist for profit but rather to offer critical goods and services to society that cannot be supplied economically by established firms. This model is characterized by fixed pricing, monopoly access to consumers, an advantage in exploiting resources, minimal or no tax obligations, and recurring financial losses.

Supply chain:

A supply chain is a network of companies, people, activities, data, and resources that facilitate the movement of goods and services from supplier to consumer. The supply chain processes natural resources, raw materials, and components into a completed product supplied to the ultimate consumer. In addition, used goods may re-enter the distribution network at any point where residual value is recyclable in advanced supply chain systems. Thus, value chains are connected through supply chains.

Why COFCO’s Business Model is so successful?

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