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Dai-ichi Life Insurance’s Business Strategy Case Study

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Dai-ichi Life Insurance’s Company Overview


The Dai-ichi Life Insurance Company, is the third-largest life insurer in Japan by revenue, behind Japan Post Insurance and Nippon Life. Founded on September 15, 1902, Dai-Ichi was the oldest mutual insurance company in Japan until a motion to demutualize passed in 2009 and, on April 1, 2010, it listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange, raising 1.01 trillion yen. As of March 2013, it had the most assets of any listed company in Japan with a total of 33 trillion yen on its stand-alone balance sheet, more than twice the total assets of #2-ranked Tokyo Electric Power Company.

www.dai-ichi-life.co.jp

Country: Japan

Foundations date: 1902

Type: Public

Sector: Financials

Categories: Insurance


Dai-ichi Life Insurance’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: heirloom

Emotional: provides access, reduces anxiety, wellness, therapeutic value

Functional: reduces risks, quality, reduces cost, variety, saves time, avoids hassles, simplifies, reduces effort


Dai-ichi Life Insurance’s Related Competitors


Aegon State Farm Insurance Cos. Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance MetLife Allianz Zurich Insurance Group

Dai-ichi Life Insurance’s Business Operations


Cash machine:

The cash machine business model allows companies to obtain money from sales since consumers pay ahead for the goods they purchase, but the costs required to generate the revenue are not yet paid. This increases companies' liquidity, which they may use to pay off debt or make additional investments. Among several others, the online store Amazon often employs this business model.

Customer data:

It primarily offers free services to users, stores their personal information, and acts as a platform for users to interact with one another. Additional value is generated by gathering and processing consumer data in advantageous ways for internal use or transfer to interested third parties. Revenue is produced by either directly selling the data to outsiders or by leveraging it for internal reasons, such as increasing the efficacy of advertising. Thus, innovative, sustainable Big Data business models are as prevalent and desired as they are elusive (i.e., data is the new oil).

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Customer relationship:

Due to the high cost of client acquisition, acquiring a sizable wallet share, economies of scale are crucial. Customer relationship management (CRM) is a technique for dealing with a business's interactions with current and prospective customers that aims to analyze data about customers' interactions with a company to improve business relationships with customers, with a particular emphasis on retention, and ultimately to drive sales growth.

Healthcare:

The prevention, treatment, and management of disease and maintaining mental and physical well-being via the medical and allied health professionals' services. It includes diagnostic, preventative, remedial, and therapeutic service providers such as physicians, nurses, hospitals, and other private, public, and volunteer organizations. Additionally, it comprises producers of medical equipment and pharmaceuticals, as well as health insurance companies.

Solution provider:

A solution provider consolidates all goods and services in a particular domain into a single point of contact. As a result, the client is supplied with a unique know-how to improve efficiency and performance. As a Solution Provider, a business may avoid revenue loss by broadening the scope of the service it offers, which adds value to the product. Additionally, close client interaction enables a better understanding of the customer's habits and requirements, enhancing goods and services.

Subscription:

Subscription business models are built on the concept of providing a product or service in exchange for recurring subscription income on a monthly or annual basis. As a result, they place a higher premium on client retention than on customer acquisition. Subscription business models, in essence, concentrate on revenue generation in such a manner that a single client makes repeated payments for extended access to a product or service. Cable television, internet providers, software suppliers, websites (e.g., blogs), business solutions providers, and financial services companies utilize this approach, as do conventional newspapers, periodicals, and academic publications.

Why Dai-ichi Life Insurance’s Business Model is so successful?

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