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Why Danone's Business Model is so successful?

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Danone’s Company Overview


Danone SA is engaged in holding directly or indirectly companies, and coordination of the main functions and activities. The company operates through four Segments: Fresh Dairy Products Division, Waters Division, early-life nutrition Division and Medical Nutrition Division. The Fresh Dairy products Division produces and markets yogurts, fermented fresh dairy products, and specialized dairy products. The waters Division comprises the natural waters business along with Aquadrinks (waters flavored and vitamin-enriched with natural fruit juice extracts, fruit juice, and vitamins). The early-life nutrition Division focuses on the right nutrition in the first 1.000 days from the start of pregnancy to two years of age and produces and distributes specialized foods for babies and young children to complement breast-feeding. The Medical Nutrition Division produces and distributes specialized food for people afflicted with certain illnesses or frail elderly people.

www.danone.com

Country: France

Foundations date: 1919

Type: Public

Sector: Consumer Goods

Categories: Food & Beverages


Danone’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing:

Emotional: badge value, wellness, therapeutic value, provides access, design/aesthetics

Functional: quality, variety, sensory appeal


Danone’s Related Competitors



Danone’s Business Operations


Brands consortium:

A collection of brands that coexist under the auspices of a parent business. The businesses in this pattern develop, produce, and market equipment. Their strength is in copywriting. Occasionally used to refer to a short-term agreement in which many companies (from the same or other industrial sectors or countries) combine their financial and personnel resources to execute a significant project benefiting all group members.

Bundling:

Multiple products or services have been bundled together to enhance the value. Bundling is a marketing technique in which goods or services are bundled to be sold as a single entity. Bundling enables the purchasing of several goods and services from a single vendor. While the goods and services are often linked, they may also consist of different items that appeal to a particular market segment.

Cross-subsidiary:

When products and goods and products and services are integrated, they form a subsidiary side and a money side, maximizing the overall revenue impact. A subsidiary is a firm owned entirely or in part by another business, referred to as the parent company or holding company. A parent company with subsidiaries is a kind of conglomerate, a corporation that consists of several distinct companies; sometimes, the national or worldwide dispersion of the offices necessitates the establishment of subsidiaries.

Culture is brand:

It requires workers to live brand values to solve issues, make internal choices, and provide a branded consumer. Developing a distinctive and enduring cultural brand is the advertising industry's holy grail. Utilizing the hazy combination of time, attitude, and emotion to identify and replicate an ideology is near to marketing magic.

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Customer relationship:

Due to the high cost of client acquisition, acquiring a sizable wallet share, economies of scale are crucial. Customer relationship management (CRM) is a technique for dealing with a business's interactions with current and prospective customers that aims to analyze data about customers' interactions with a company to improve business relationships with customers, with a particular emphasis on retention, and ultimately to drive sales growth.

Dynamic branding:

Dynamic branding is a technique for refreshing your identity without totally altering it. You can link to anything; you may modify the logo according to the seasons or for a particular event. It has been proven effective many times. However, it does not work for every business.

Embedded social enterprises:

The built-in social model is predicated on the premise that everyone wants to do good and lose weight in their awareness in a highly consumerist society. Toms Shoes was the first business to establish a successful strategy for include contributions in the value of its bids. Concentrating on shoe sales, the company gained notoriety in the media and its consumers when they announced that another team is given to a charity for every pair of shoes bought.

Experience selling:

An experience in the sales model describes how a typical user perceives or comprehends a system's operation. A product or service's value is enhanced when an extra customer experience is included. Visual representations of experience models are abstract diagrams or metaphors derived from recognizable objects, actions, or systems. User interfaces use a range of experience models to help users rapidly comprehend what is occurring in the design, where they are, and what they may do next. For example, a software experience model may depict the connection between two applications and the relationship between an application and different navigation methods and other system or software components.

Ingredient branding:

Ingredient branding is a kind of marketing in which a component or ingredient of a product or service is elevated to prominence and given its own identity. It is the process of developing a brand for an element or component of a product in order to communicate the ingredient's superior quality or performance. For example, everybody is aware of the now-famous Intel Inside and its subsequent success.

Long tail:

The long tail is a strategy that allows businesses to realize significant profit out of selling low volumes of hard-to-find items to many customers instead of only selling large volumes of a reduced number of popular items. The term was coined in 2004 by Chris Anderson, who argued that products in low demand or with low sales volume can collectively make up market share that rivals or exceeds the relatively few current bestsellers and blockbusters but only if the store or distribution channel is large enough.

Low touch:

Historically, developing a standard touch sales model for business sales required recruiting and training a Salesforce user who was tasked with the responsibility of generating quality leads, arranging face-to-face meetings, giving presentations, and eventually closing transactions. However, the idea of a low-touch sales strategy is not new; it dates all the way back to the 1980s.

Make and distribute:

In this arrangement, the producer creates the product and distributes it to distributors, who oversee the goods' ongoing management in the market.

Nonprofit organization:

The nonprofit world rarely engages in equally clear and succinct conversations about an organization’s long-term funding strategy. It works on funds and provides services to the user free of cost. That is because the different types of funding that fuel nonprofits have never been clearly defined. A nonprofit organization is often dedicated to furthering a particular social cause or advocating for a particular point of view. In economic terms, a nonprofit organization uses its surplus revenues to further achieve its purpose or mission, rather than distributing its surplus income to the organization's shareholders (or equivalents) as profit or dividends.

Open innovation:

A business concept established by Henry Chesbrough that inspires firms to pursue out external sources of innovation in order to enhance product lines and reduce the time needed to bring the product to the market, as well as to industry or release developed in-house innovation that does not fit the customer's experience but could be used effectively elsewhere.

Product innovation:

Product innovation is the process of developing and introducing a new or better version of an existing product or service. This is a broader definition of innovation than the generally recognized definition, which includes creating new goods that are considered innovative in this context. For example, Apple launched a succession of successful new products and services in 2001?the iPod, the iTunes online music service, and the iPhone?which catapulted the firm to the top of its industry.

Regular replacement:

It includes items that must be replaced on a regular basis; the user cannot reuse them. Consumables are products utilized by people and companies and must be returned regularly due to wear and tear or depletion. Additionally, they may be described as components of a final product consumed or irreversibly changed throughout the production process, including semiconductor wafers and basic chemicals.

Robin Hood:

They 'rob' the wealthy and give to the needy, which distinguishes them from their main competitor, who does the polar opposite. Products and services are used by 'the poor' for a low or even no cost, while 'the wealthy' pay a more fantastic price. In addition, it contributes to brand recognition and makes 'the wealthy' feel better about purchasing since it benefits impoverished people. The most outstanding example is TOMS Shoes, which gives one pair of shoes to a kid in need for every couple sold to customers.

Social stakeholder:

Social responsibility will only be accurate if many managers embrace moral leadership rather than immoral leadership, organizational management, and business ethics that engage morals and values in corporate governance. In a nutshell, it addresses the concept of who or what really matters.

Sponsorship:

In most instances, support is not intended to be philanthropic; instead, it is a mutually beneficial commercial relationship. In the highly competitive sponsorship climate of sport, a business aligning its brand with a mark seeks a variety of economic, public relations, and product placement benefits. Sponsors also seek to establish public trust, acceptability, or alignment with the perceived image a sport has built or acquired by leveraging their connection with an athlete, team, league, or the sport itself.

Target the poor:

The product or service provided here is aimed towards the bottom of the pyramid rather than the top. The target of the flawed business model is a financially feasible strategy that helps low-income communities by integrating them in the value chain of a firm on the demand side as customers and consumers and the supply side as producers, entrepreneurs, or workers in a sustainable manner. While the business earns a little profit on each product sold, it profits from the increased sales volume often associated with a large client base.

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