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Glam Beauty Bar’s Business Strategy Case Study

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Glam Beauty Bar’s Company Overview


GLAMbeauty bar is more than just a fun place to get makeup, spray tans and the latest and greatest hairstyles. That means that their team of professional Estheticians, Makeup Artists and Hair Stylists (the GLAMbarbies) will transform your vision into your best self through hair styling and makeup application, beautifully bronzed custom airbrush tanning, full body waxing, lash extensions, blowouts and in salon classes.

http://www.glambeauty.bar/

Country: Oregon

Foundations date: 2013

Type: Private

Sector: Consumer Services

Categories: Beauty


Glam Beauty Bar’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: self-actualization, motivation

Emotional: rewards me, design/aesthetics, therapeutic value

Functional: quality, sensory appeal


Glam Beauty Bar’s Related Competitors


L’Oréal Birchbox Beauty'in Styleseat Treatwell Mary Kay

Glam Beauty Bar’s Business Operations


Add-on:

An additional item offered to a customer of a primary product or service is referred to as an add-on sale. Depending on the industry, add-on sales may generate substantial income and profits for a firm. For example, when a customer has decided to purchase the core product or service, the salesman at an automotive dealership will usually offer an add-on sale. The pattern is used in the price of new software programs based on access to new features, number of users, and so forth.

Advertising:

This approach generated money by sending promotional marketing messages from other businesses to customers. When you establish a for-profit company, one of the most critical aspects of your strategy is determining how to generate income. Many companies sell either products or services or a mix of the two. However, advertisers are frequently the source of the majority of all of the revenue for online businesses and media organizations. This is referred to as an ad-based income model.

Cross-selling:

Cross-selling is a business strategy in which additional services or goods are offered to the primary offering to attract new consumers and retain existing ones. Numerous businesses are increasingly diversifying their product lines with items that have little resemblance to their primary offerings. Walmart is one such example; they used to offer everything but food. They want their stores to function as one-stop shops. Thus, companies mitigate their reliance on particular items and increase overall sustainability by providing other goods and services.

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Customer relationship:

Due to the high cost of client acquisition, acquiring a sizable wallet share, economies of scale are crucial. Customer relationship management (CRM) is a technique for dealing with a business's interactions with current and prospective customers that aims to analyze data about customers' interactions with a company to improve business relationships with customers, with a particular emphasis on retention, and ultimately to drive sales growth.

Discount club:

The discount club concept is built on perpetual high-discount deals utilized as a continual marketing plan or a brief period (usually one day). This might be seen as a reduction in the face value of an invoice prepared in advance of its payments in the medium or long term.

Dynamic branding:

Dynamic branding is a technique for refreshing your identity without totally altering it. You can link to anything; you may modify the logo according to the seasons or for a particular event. It has been proven effective many times. However, it does not work for every business.

Experience selling:

An experience in the sales model describes how a typical user perceives or comprehends a system's operation. A product or service's value is enhanced when an extra customer experience is included. Visual representations of experience models are abstract diagrams or metaphors derived from recognizable objects, actions, or systems. User interfaces use a range of experience models to help users rapidly comprehend what is occurring in the design, where they are, and what they may do next. For example, a software experience model may depict the connection between two applications and the relationship between an application and different navigation methods and other system or software components.

Fashion sense:

In any customized sense of style, the golden guideline is to buy garments that fit correctly. Nothing ruins an ensemble more than an ill-fitting jacket, shirt, or trouser, regardless of the dress code or the cost of the clothing. Personal Values Sharing as a Brand Identity A significant component of developing a company that fits your lifestyle is growing a business grounded in your beliefs.

Long tail:

The long tail is a strategy that allows businesses to realize significant profit out of selling low volumes of hard-to-find items to many customers instead of only selling large volumes of a reduced number of popular items. The term was coined in 2004 by Chris Anderson, who argued that products in low demand or with low sales volume can collectively make up market share that rivals or exceeds the relatively few current bestsellers and blockbusters but only if the store or distribution channel is large enough.

Membership club:

Belonging to a group, either individually or collectively. Certain memberships may charge a fee to join or participate, while others are free. Others have particular skill criteria that must be met before membership is granted. Members are entitled to specific benefits or advantages, but not all members may enjoy the same rights and privileges. Another method is taken by a members-only luxury lifestyle management business that offers concierge services such as vacation reservations, restaurant suggestions, and event access.

Ultimate luxury:

This business approach is based on product distinctiveness and a high level of quality, emphasizing individuals with significant buying power. The expenditures required to create distinction are covered by the comparatively high prices charged, which often allow for very high profits.

Why Glam Beauty Bar’s Business Model is so successful?

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