This web app uses cookies to compile statistic information of our users visits. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. If you wish you may change your preference or read about cookies

close

Why Indeed's Business Model is so successful?

Get all the answers


Indeed’s Company Overview


Indeed is a global employment-related search engine that connects job seekers with employers, providing a platform for individuals to find employment opportunities and for businesses to identify qualified candidates. Established in 2004, Indeed has become one of the largest and most widely used job search platforms, operating in over 60 countries and available in multiple languages. The platform aggregates job listings from various sources, offering a comprehensive and user-friendly experience for both job seekers and employers. Indeed is a subsidiary of Japan's Recruit Co. Ltd. and is co-headquartered in Austin, Texas and Stamford, Connecticut with additional offices worldwide. As a single-topic search engine, it is also an example of vertical search. Indeed is currently available in over 60 countries and 28 languages. In October 2010, Indeed.com passed Monster.com to become the highest-traffic job website in the United States. This portfolio includes two additional employment-related search engines: SimplyHired and SimplyBounty. Indeed also partners with other job search engines and job boards to add value for job-seekers. Business Model: Indeed operates on a straightforward and effective business model centered around facilitating the hiring process for both job seekers and employers: Job Listings: Employers pay to post job listings on Indeed, giving them visibility to a vast pool of job seekers actively searching for employment opportunities. The cost of job listings may vary based on factors such as location, industry, and the level of visibility and promotion desired by the employer. Pay-Per-Click Advertising: Indeed employs a pay-per-click (PPC) advertising model, allowing employers to boost the visibility of their job listings through sponsored placements. Employers pay a fee each time a job seeker clicks on their sponsored listing, ensuring they only pay for the engagement generated by their postings. Resume Database Access: Employers can access Indeed's extensive resume database to identify and reach out to potential candidates directly. Indeed charges employers a subscription fee for this service, allowing them to search for and connect with individuals whose resumes match their hiring needs. Featured Employer Profiles: Indeed allows employers to create featured profiles that showcase their company culture, values, and job opportunities. These featured profiles are designed to attract top talent and enhance the employer's brand visibility. Employers pay a fee for enhanced branding and promotion on the platform. Recruitment Advertising: Indeed provides additional advertising solutions, including banner ads and display advertising, enabling employers to promote their brand and job opportunities to a broader audience. These additional advertising options contribute to Indeed's revenue streams. Indeed Assessments: Indeed offers pre-employment testing and assessments to help employers evaluate candidates' skills and qualifications more effectively. Employers pay fees for access to Indeed Assessments, allowing them to streamline their hiring processes and make data-driven hiring decisions. Revenue Model: Indeed's revenue model is primarily based on the following revenue streams: Job Listing Fees: Employers pay Indeed to post their job listings on the platform, with fees often determined by factors such as job location, industry, and the level of visibility desired. Pay-Per-Click Advertising: Employers pay for sponsored job listings on a pay-per-click basis, ensuring they only incur costs when job seekers actively engage with their postings. Resume Database Access: Employers subscribe to Indeed's services to access the platform's extensive resume database and identify potential candidates. Featured Employer Profiles: Companies pay fees to have featured profiles that showcase their brand and job opportunities, attracting top talent and enhancing their visibility on the platform. Additional Advertising Solutions: Employers may invest in additional advertising options, such as banner ads and display advertising, to promote their brand and job openings further. Indeed Assessments: Employers pay for Indeed Assessments, utilizing pre-employment testing and assessments to make more informed hiring decisions. Indeed's robust business model and diversified revenue streams have contributed to its success as a leading job search platform, benefiting both job seekers and employers in the competitive world of recruitment.

https://es.indeed.com/?r=us

Country: Texas

Foundations date: 2004

Type: private

Sector: Information & Media

Categories: Platform


Indeed’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: rewards me, fun/entertainment, attractiveness

Functional: saves time, simplifies, reduces effort, informs


Indeed’s Related Competitors



Indeed’s Business Operations


Advertising:

This approach generated money by sending promotional marketing messages from other businesses to customers. When you establish a for-profit company, one of the most critical aspects of your strategy is determining how to generate income. Many companies sell either products or services or a mix of the two. However, advertisers are frequently the source of the majority of all of the revenue for online businesses and media organizations. This is referred to as an ad-based income model.

Archetypes of business model design:

The business model archetypes include many business personalities and more than one business model linked to various goods or services. There is a common foundation behind the scenes of each unit, but from a management standpoint, each group may operate independently.

Brands consortium:

A collection of brands that coexist under the auspices of a parent business. The businesses in this pattern develop, produce, and market equipment. Their strength is in copywriting. Occasionally used to refer to a short-term agreement in which many companies (from the same or other industrial sectors or countries) combine their financial and personnel resources to execute a significant project benefiting all group members.

Brokerage:

A brokerage firm's primary responsibility is to serve as a middleman, connecting buyers and sellers to complete transactions. Accordingly, brokerage firms are compensated through commission once a transaction is completed. For example, when a stock trade order is executed, a transaction fee is paid by an investor to repay the brokerage firm for its efforts in completing the transaction.

Community-funded:

The critical resource in this business strategy is a community's intellect. Three distinct consumer groups comprise this multifaceted business model: believers, suppliers, and purchasers. First, believers join the online community platform and contribute to the production of goods by vendors. Second, buyers purchase these goods, which may be visual, aural, or literary in nature. Finally, believers may be purchasers or providers, and vice versa.

Customer data:

It primarily offers free services to users, stores their personal information, and acts as a platform for users to interact with one another. Additional value is generated by gathering and processing consumer data in advantageous ways for internal use or transfer to interested third parties. Revenue is produced by either directly selling the data to outsiders or by leveraging it for internal reasons, such as increasing the efficacy of advertising. Thus, innovative, sustainable Big Data business models are as prevalent and desired as they are elusive (i.e., data is the new oil).

Channel aggregation:

Consolidating numerous distribution routes into one to achieve greater economic efficiency. A business model for internet commerce in which a company (that does not manufacture or warehouse any item) gathers (aggregates) information about products and services from many competing sources and displays it on its website. The firm's strength is in its power to create an 'environment' that attracts users to its website and develop a system that facilitates pricing and specification matching.

Decomposition:

Simplifying many product kinds inside a product group or set of goods. A technique for doing business analysis in which a complex business process is dissected to reveal its constituent parts. Functional decomposition is a technique that may be used to contribute to an understanding and management of large and complicated processes and assist in issue solving. Additionally, functional decomposition is utilized in computer engineering to aid in the creation of software.

Digital:

A digital strategy is a strategic management and a business reaction or solution to a digital issue, which is often best handled as part of a broader company plan. A digital strategy is frequently defined by the application of new technologies to existing business activities and a focus on enabling new digital skills for their company (such as those formed by the Information Age and frequently as a result of advances in digital technologies such as computers, data, telecommunication services, and the World wide web, to name a few).

Dynamic branding:

Dynamic branding is a technique for refreshing your identity without totally altering it. You can link to anything; you may modify the logo according to the seasons or for a particular event. It has been proven effective many times. However, it does not work for every business.

Ecosystem:

A business ecosystem is a collection of related entities ? suppliers, distributors, customers, rivals, and government agencies ? collaborating and providing a particular product or service. The concept is that each entity in the ecosystem influences and is impacted by the others, resulting in an ever-changing connection. Therefore, each entity must be adaptive and flexible to live, much like a biological ecosystem. These connections are often backed by a shared technical platform and are based on the flow of information, resources, and artifacts in the software ecosystem.

Exposure:

This model collects data and connects it to others; it is suggested to investigate the impact of advertising on consumer purchase dynamics by explicitly linking the distribution of exposures from a brand's media schedule to the brand purchase incidence behavior patterns over time. The danger is that we may be unable to react productively and cost-effectively to technological and market changes.

Featured listings:

A highlighted listing is more important and noticeable than a regular listing, providing maximum exposure for your workplace to consumers searching in your region. In addition, customers are attracted to these premium listings because they include more pictures of your home ? and its excellent location.

Freemium:

Freemium is the sum of the words free and premium and refers to a business strategy that provides both free and premium services. The freemium business model works by providing essential services for free and charging for enhanced or extra capabilities. This is a typical practice among many software firms, who offer imperative software for free with restricted functionality, and it is also a popular approach among game developers. While everyone is invited to play the game for free, extra lives and unique game features are accessible only once the player buys.

Long tail:

The long tail is a strategy that allows businesses to realize significant profit out of selling low volumes of hard-to-find items to many customers instead of only selling large volumes of a reduced number of popular items. The term was coined in 2004 by Chris Anderson, who argued that products in low demand or with low sales volume can collectively make up market share that rivals or exceeds the relatively few current bestsellers and blockbusters but only if the store or distribution channel is large enough.

Mobile first behavior:

It is intended to mean that as a company thinks about its website or its other digital means of communications, it should be thinking critically about the mobile experience and how customers and employees will interact with it from their many devices. The term is “mobile first,” and it is intended to mean that as a company thinks about its website or its other digital means of communications, it should be thinking critically about the mobile experience and how customers and employees will interact with it from their many devices.

On-demand economy:

The on-demand economy is described as economic activity generated by digital marketplaces that meet customer demand for products and services via quick access and accessible supply. The supply chain is managed via a highly efficient, intuitive digital mesh built on top of current infrastructure networks. The on-demand economy is transforming commercial behavior in cities worldwide. The number of businesses, the categories covered, and the industry's growth rate are all increasing. Businesses in this new economy are the culmination of years of technological progress and customer behavior change.

Online marketplace:

An online marketplace (or online e-commerce marketplace) is a kind of e-commerce website in which product or service information is supplied by various third parties or, in some instances, the brand itself, while the marketplace operator handles transactions. Additionally, this pattern encompasses peer-to-peer (P2P) e-commerce between businesses or people. By and large, since marketplaces aggregate goods from a diverse range of suppliers, the variety and availability are typically greater than in vendor-specific online retail shops. Additionally, pricing might be more competitive.

Reputation builders:

Reputation builders is an innovative software platform that enables companies to create, collect, and manage positive internet reviews. It was a pioneer in the utilization of user-generated material. The website services are provided for free to users, who supply the majority of the content, and the websites of related businesses are monetized via advertising.

Self-service:

A retail business model in which consumers self-serve the goods they want to buy. Self-service business concepts include self-service food buffets, self-service petrol stations, and self-service markets. Self-service is available through phone, online, and email to automate customer support interactions. Self-service Software and self-service applications (for example, online banking apps, shopping portals, and self-service check-in at airports) are becoming more prevalent.

Subscription:

Subscription business models are built on the concept of providing a product or service in exchange for recurring subscription income on a monthly or annual basis. As a result, they place a higher premium on client retention than on customer acquisition. Subscription business models, in essence, concentrate on revenue generation in such a manner that a single client makes repeated payments for extended access to a product or service. Cable television, internet providers, software suppliers, websites (e.g., blogs), business solutions providers, and financial services companies utilize this approach, as do conventional newspapers, periodicals, and academic publications.

Transaction facilitator:

The business acts as an acquirer, processing payments on behalf of online merchants, auction sites, and other commercial users for a fee. This encompasses all elements of purchasing, selling, and exchanging currencies at current or predetermined exchange rates. By far the biggest market in the world in terms of trade volume. The largest multinational banks are the leading players in this industry. Around the globe, financial hubs serve as anchors for trade between a diverse range of various kinds of buyers and sellers 24 hours a day, save on weekends.

Two-sided market:

Two-sided marketplaces, also called two-sided networks, are commercial platforms featuring two different user groups that mutually profit from the web. A multi-sided platform is an organization that generates value mainly via the facilitation of direct contacts between two (or more) distinct kinds of connected consumers (MSP). A two-sided market enables interactions between many interdependent consumer groups. The platform's value grows as more groups or individual members of each group use it. For example, eBay is a marketplace that links buyers and sellers. Google connects advertising and searchers. Social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook are also bidirectional, linking consumers and marketers.

User design:

A client is both the manufacturer and the consumer in user manufacturing. For instance, an online platform could offer the client the tools required to create and market the product, such as product design software, manufacturing services, or an online store to sell the goods. In addition, numerous software solutions enable users to create and customize their products to respond to changing consumer requirements seamlessly.

Embed code:

x
Copy the code below and embed it in yours to show this business model canvas in your website.