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Why Meril Life's Business Model is so successful?

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Meril Life’s Company Overview


Meril Life Sciences is a global medical device company dedicated to the innovation, design, and development of novel, clinically relevant, and state-of-the-art medical technologies. The company is headquartered in Vapi, Gujarat, India, and operates in more than 100 countries worldwide. Meril Life Sciences is committed to providing high-quality healthcare solutions, addressing the needs of healthcare professionals and patients alike. The company's broad portfolio includes products in the areas of vascular interventional devices, orthopedics, in-vitro diagnostics, and endo-surgery. Meril Life Sciences' business model is built around the research, development, and manufacturing of advanced medical devices and pharmaceutical products. The company collaborates with healthcare professionals to understand their needs, which guides the development of their products. Meril Life Sciences also invests significantly in clinical research to ensure the safety and efficacy of its products. Moreover, the company provides training to healthcare professionals to ensure the proper use of its products, thereby maximizing patient benefit. The revenue model of Meril Life Sciences primarily revolves around the sales of its wide range of medical devices and pharmaceutical products. The company generates revenue through direct sales to hospitals, clinics, and healthcare professionals worldwide. In addition, Meril Life Sciences earns revenue from partnerships with other medical device companies for the distribution of its products in certain markets. Furthermore, the company benefits from government contracts and grants for its ongoing research and development activities. The company's commitment to innovation and quality has enabled it to establish a strong market presence and achieve sustainable revenue growth.

https://www.merillife.com/

Country: New Delhi

Foundations date: 2007

Type: Private

Sector: Healthcare

Categories: Biotechnology


Meril Life’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: wellness, therapeutic value

Functional: quality, variety, informs


Meril Life’s Related Competitors



Meril Life’s Business Operations


Archetypes of business model design:

The business model archetypes include many business personalities and more than one business model linked to various goods or services. There is a common foundation behind the scenes of each unit, but from a management standpoint, each group may operate independently.

Best in class services:

When a firm brings a product to market, it must first create a compelling product and then field a workforce capable of manufacturing it at a competitive price. Neither task is simple to perform effectively; much managerial effort and scholarly study have been dedicated to these issues. Nevertheless, providing a service involves another aspect: managing clients, who are consumers of the service and may also contribute to its creation.

Biopharma:

A firm assumes complete control of the biopharmaceutical model's research, development, and commercialization (DDC) operations. Under this approach, the firm develops the product internally and retains commercial skills to deliver the product to patients.

Bundling:

Multiple products or services have been bundled together to enhance the value. Bundling is a marketing technique in which goods or services are bundled to be sold as a single entity. Bundling enables the purchasing of several goods and services from a single vendor. While the goods and services are often linked, they may also consist of different items that appeal to a particular market segment.

Corporate innovation:

Innovation is the outcome of collaborative creativity in turning an idea into a feasible concept, accompanied by a collaborative effort to bring that concept to life as a product, service, or process improvement. The digital era has created an environment conducive to business model innovation since technology has transformed how businesses operate and provide services to consumers.

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Customer relationship:

Due to the high cost of client acquisition, acquiring a sizable wallet share, economies of scale are crucial. Customer relationship management (CRM) is a technique for dealing with a business's interactions with current and prospective customers that aims to analyze data about customers' interactions with a company to improve business relationships with customers, with a particular emphasis on retention, and ultimately to drive sales growth.

Decomposition:

Simplifying many product kinds inside a product group or set of goods. A technique for doing business analysis in which a complex business process is dissected to reveal its constituent parts. Functional decomposition is a technique that may be used to contribute to an understanding and management of large and complicated processes and assist in issue solving. Additionally, functional decomposition is utilized in computer engineering to aid in the creation of software.

Digital transformation:

Digitalization is the systematic and accelerated transformation of company operations, processes, skills, and models to fully exploit the changes and possibilities brought about by digital technology and its effect on society. Digital transformation is a journey with many interconnected intermediate objectives, with the ultimate aim of continuous enhancement of processes, divisions, and the business ecosystem in a hyperconnected age. Therefore, establishing the appropriate bridges for the trip is critical to success.

Healthcare:

The prevention, treatment, and management of disease and maintaining mental and physical well-being via the medical and allied health professionals' services. It includes diagnostic, preventative, remedial, and therapeutic service providers such as physicians, nurses, hospitals, and other private, public, and volunteer organizations. Additionally, it comprises producers of medical equipment and pharmaceuticals, as well as health insurance companies.

Licensing:

A formal agreement in which the owner of the copyright, know-how, patent, service mark, trademark, or other intellectual property grants a licensee the right to use, manufacture, and sell copies of the original. These agreements often restrict the licensee's scope or area of operation, define whether the license is exclusive or non-exclusive, and stipulate whether the licensee will pay royalties or another kind of compensation in return. While licensing agreements are often used to commercialize the technology, franchisees also utilize them to encourage the sale of products and services.

Low touch:

Historically, developing a standard touch sales model for business sales required recruiting and training a Salesforce user who was tasked with the responsibility of generating quality leads, arranging face-to-face meetings, giving presentations, and eventually closing transactions. However, the idea of a low-touch sales strategy is not new; it dates all the way back to the 1980s.

Make and distribute:

In this arrangement, the producer creates the product and distributes it to distributors, who oversee the goods' ongoing management in the market.

Open innovation:

A business concept established by Henry Chesbrough that inspires firms to pursue out external sources of innovation in order to enhance product lines and reduce the time needed to bring the product to the market, as well as to industry or release developed in-house innovation that does not fit the customer's experience but could be used effectively elsewhere.

Product innovation:

Product innovation is the process of developing and introducing a new or better version of an existing product or service. This is a broader definition of innovation than the generally recognized definition, which includes creating new goods that are considered innovative in this context. For example, Apple launched a succession of successful new products and services in 2001?the iPod, the iTunes online music service, and the iPhone?which catapulted the firm to the top of its industry.

Solution provider:

A solution provider consolidates all goods and services in a particular domain into a single point of contact. As a result, the client is supplied with a unique know-how to improve efficiency and performance. As a Solution Provider, a business may avoid revenue loss by broadening the scope of the service it offers, which adds value to the product. Additionally, close client interaction enables a better understanding of the customer's habits and requirements, enhancing goods and services.

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