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Why Nykaa's Business Model is so successful?

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Nykaa’s Company Overview


Nykaa is a prominent e-commerce platform in India, specializing in beauty and skincare products. Launched in 2012, the company has become a one-stop destination for consumers seeking a diverse range of cosmetics, skincare, haircare, and wellness products from both local and international brands. Nykaa operates through a user-friendly website and a mobile application, offering a seamless shopping experience. The platform not only provides an extensive product catalog but also features beauty tutorials, expert reviews, and personalized recommendations to assist customers in making informed choices. Nykaa's business model encompasses the sale of beauty and wellness products, generating revenue through online transactions. The company frequently collaborates with beauty influencers and celebrities to enhance its brand visibility and engage with its customer base. With a commitment to quality, authenticity, and customer satisfaction, Nykaa has emerged as a leading player in the beauty and skincare e-commerce sector, contributing to the digital transformation of India's beauty industry.

https://www.nykaa.com/

Country: Maharashtra

Foundations date: 2012

Type: Private

Sector: Consumer Goods

Categories: Beauty


Nykaa’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: rewards me, nostalgia, design/aesthetics, badge value, fun/entertainment, attractiveness

Functional: saves time, simplifies, makes money, reduces risk, organizes, integrates, connects, reduces effort, avoids hassles, reduces cost, quality, variety, sensory appeal, informs


Nykaa’s Related Competitors



Nykaa’s Business Operations


Advertising:

This approach generated money by sending promotional marketing messages from other businesses to customers. When you establish a for-profit company, one of the most critical aspects of your strategy is determining how to generate income. Many companies sell either products or services or a mix of the two. However, advertisers are frequently the source of the majority of all of the revenue for online businesses and media organizations. This is referred to as an ad-based income model.

Customer relationship:

Due to the high cost of client acquisition, acquiring a sizable wallet share, economies of scale are crucial. Customer relationship management (CRM) is a technique for dealing with a business's interactions with current and prospective customers that aims to analyze data about customers' interactions with a company to improve business relationships with customers, with a particular emphasis on retention, and ultimately to drive sales growth.

Customer data:

It primarily offers free services to users, stores their personal information, and acts as a platform for users to interact with one another. Additional value is generated by gathering and processing consumer data in advantageous ways for internal use or transfer to interested third parties. Revenue is produced by either directly selling the data to outsiders or by leveraging it for internal reasons, such as increasing the efficacy of advertising. Thus, innovative, sustainable Big Data business models are as prevalent and desired as they are elusive (i.e., data is the new oil).

One-off experience:

The one-off experience business concept aims to facilitate the interaction between consumers in abundant marketplaces and their experience-seeking counterparts. This business model can only succeed if social media firms collaborate with physical event organizers, online pop-up shops, and e-commerce merchants. Developing software and participating in continuous dialogue with their consumers is insufficient. This business model provides consumers with unique experiences at a particular location during a specific event.

Experience selling:

An experience in the sales model describes how a typical user perceives or comprehends a system's operation. A product or service's value is enhanced when an extra customer experience is included. Visual representations of experience models are abstract diagrams or metaphors derived from recognizable objects, actions, or systems. User interfaces use a range of experience models to help users rapidly comprehend what is occurring in the design, where they are, and what they may do next. For example, a software experience model may depict the connection between two applications and the relationship between an application and different navigation methods and other system or software components.

Virtual reality:

AR/VR is the fourth significant platform change (after PC, web, and mobile). First, CEOs must choose how to play. Business models are determined by installed bases, use cases, and unit economics; there is no one-size-fits-all answer; each situation is unique, and developers must do market research and analysis before making a choice. Relying on advertising-income is a handy strategy for unknown businesses or newcomers to the market. It allows them to use their prior expertise with mobile and online ad campaigns.

Online marketplace:

An online marketplace (or online e-commerce marketplace) is a kind of e-commerce website in which product or service information is supplied by various third parties or, in some instances, the brand itself, while the marketplace operator handles transactions. Additionally, this pattern encompasses peer-to-peer (P2P) e-commerce between businesses or people. By and large, since marketplaces aggregate goods from a diverse range of suppliers, the variety and availability are typically greater than in vendor-specific online retail shops. Additionally, pricing might be more competitive.

Subscription:

Subscription business models are built on the concept of providing a product or service in exchange for recurring subscription income on a monthly or annual basis. As a result, they place a higher premium on client retention than on customer acquisition. Subscription business models, in essence, concentrate on revenue generation in such a manner that a single client makes repeated payments for extended access to a product or service. Cable television, internet providers, software suppliers, websites (e.g., blogs), business solutions providers, and financial services companies utilize this approach, as do conventional newspapers, periodicals, and academic publications.

eCommerce:

Electronic commerce, or e-commerce (alternatively spelled eCommerce), is a business model, or a subset of a larger business model, that allows a company or person to do business via an electronic network, usually the internet. As a result, customers gain from increased accessibility and convenience, while the business benefits from integrating sales and distribution with other internal operations. Electronic commerce is prevalent throughout all four main market segments: business to business, business to consumer, consumer to consumer, and consumer to business. Ecommerce may be used to sell almost any goods or service, from books and music to financial services and airline tickets.

Subscription box:

A subscription box is a regular delivery of retail goods to a client. Thus, subscription boxes are both a marketing tactic and a delivery mechanism for products. Subscription boxes are used by subscription-based e-commerce companies, abbreviated subcom, that operates on a subscription-based revenue model. They cater to a diverse client base and address a range of particular demands and interests. Since the subscription box business is still in its infancy, there is little data available. However, between 400 and 600 distinct types of subscription boxes are available in the United States alone, with more known internationally.

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