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Why Tidal's Business Model is so successful?

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Tidal’s Company Overview


Tidal is a subscription-based music, podcast, and video streaming service that combines lossless audio and high-definition music videos with exclusive content and special features on music. The company was launched in 2014 by Norwegian public company Aspiro and is now owned by Project Panther Bidco, a company controlled by renowned rapper and businessman, Jay-Z. Tidal prides itself on providing a platform that prioritizes the artists and their creative content, offering a high fidelity, lossless audio quality and high resolution video quality to its users. The service is available in 54 countries and has a catalogue of over 70 million tracks and 250,000 music videos. Tidal's business model is based on a subscription-based model, where users pay monthly fees in exchange for access to its vast library of music, videos, and other content. The company has two main types of subscriptions: Tidal Premium, which provides standard sound quality, high definition music videos, and expertly curated editorial, and Tidal HiFi, which offers lossless High Fidelity sound quality, HD music videos, and curated editorial. The company also collaborates with artists to produce exclusive content, which gives it a competitive edge and helps attract and retain subscribers. The primary revenue model for Tidal is the income generated from these monthly subscriptions. The company operates on a tiered pricing strategy, with the cost of subscriptions varying based on the audio quality and other features offered. Tidal also generates revenue from advertising but to a lesser extent. Another source of income is through partnerships and exclusive deals with artists and record labels. These exclusive releases often draw in new customers who are eager to access content that they can't find on other platforms. The company also makes money from live events and concerts, which are sometimes streamed live on the platform.

https://tidal.com/

Country: Norway

Foundations date: 2014

Type: Private

Sector: Information & Media

Categories: Entertainment


Tidal’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: fun/entertainment, provides access, design/aesthetics

Functional: integrates, connects, quality, variety, informs


Tidal’s Related Competitors



Tidal’s Business Operations


Channel aggregation:

Consolidating numerous distribution routes into one to achieve greater economic efficiency. A business model for internet commerce in which a company (that does not manufacture or warehouse any item) gathers (aggregates) information about products and services from many competing sources and displays it on its website. The firm's strength is in its power to create an 'environment' that attracts users to its website and develop a system that facilitates pricing and specification matching.

Advertising:

This approach generated money by sending promotional marketing messages from other businesses to customers. When you establish a for-profit company, one of the most critical aspects of your strategy is determining how to generate income. Many companies sell either products or services or a mix of the two. However, advertisers are frequently the source of the majority of all of the revenue for online businesses and media organizations. This is referred to as an ad-based income model.

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Digital:

A digital strategy is a strategic management and a business reaction or solution to a digital issue, which is often best handled as part of a broader company plan. A digital strategy is frequently defined by the application of new technologies to existing business activities and a focus on enabling new digital skills for their company (such as those formed by the Information Age and frequently as a result of advances in digital technologies such as computers, data, telecommunication services, and the World wide web, to name a few).

Integrator:

A systems integrator is an individual or business specializing in integrating component subsystems into a unified whole and ensuring that those subsystems work correctly together. A process is known as system integration. Gains in efficiency, economies of scope, and less reliance on suppliers result in cost reductions and may improve the stability of value generation.

Mobile first behavior:

It is intended to mean that as a company thinks about its website or its other digital means of communications, it should be thinking critically about the mobile experience and how customers and employees will interact with it from their many devices. The term is “mobile first,” and it is intended to mean that as a company thinks about its website or its other digital means of communications, it should be thinking critically about the mobile experience and how customers and employees will interact with it from their many devices.

Long tail:

The long tail is a strategy that allows businesses to realize significant profit out of selling low volumes of hard-to-find items to many customers instead of only selling large volumes of a reduced number of popular items. The term was coined in 2004 by Chris Anderson, who argued that products in low demand or with low sales volume can collectively make up market share that rivals or exceeds the relatively few current bestsellers and blockbusters but only if the store or distribution channel is large enough.

Licensing:

A formal agreement in which the owner of the copyright, know-how, patent, service mark, trademark, or other intellectual property grants a licensee the right to use, manufacture, and sell copies of the original. These agreements often restrict the licensee's scope or area of operation, define whether the license is exclusive or non-exclusive, and stipulate whether the licensee will pay royalties or another kind of compensation in return. While licensing agreements are often used to commercialize the technology, franchisees also utilize them to encourage the sale of products and services.

Online marketplace:

An online marketplace (or online e-commerce marketplace) is a kind of e-commerce website in which product or service information is supplied by various third parties or, in some instances, the brand itself, while the marketplace operator handles transactions. Additionally, this pattern encompasses peer-to-peer (P2P) e-commerce between businesses or people. By and large, since marketplaces aggregate goods from a diverse range of suppliers, the variety and availability are typically greater than in vendor-specific online retail shops. Additionally, pricing might be more competitive.

Subscription:

Subscription business models are built on the concept of providing a product or service in exchange for recurring subscription income on a monthly or annual basis. As a result, they place a higher premium on client retention than on customer acquisition. Subscription business models, in essence, concentrate on revenue generation in such a manner that a single client makes repeated payments for extended access to a product or service. Cable television, internet providers, software suppliers, websites (e.g., blogs), business solutions providers, and financial services companies utilize this approach, as do conventional newspapers, periodicals, and academic publications.

Music:

The music industry comprises businesses and people that make money by producing new songs and pieces and selling live performances and events, audio and video recordings, compositions, sheet music, and organizations and organizations that assist and represent artists. The music industry in the twenty-first century is a textbook example of disruptive technology, in which new technologies displace existing technologies and business models.

Tiered service:

Users may choose from a limited number of levels with gradually rising price points to get the product or goods that are most appropriate for their requirements. Such systems are widely used in the telecommunications industry, particularly in the areas of cellular service, digital and cable television, and broadband internet access. Users may choose from a limited number of levels with gradually rising price points to get the product or goods that are most appropriate for their requirements.

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