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Wilmar International’s Business Strategy Case Study

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Wilmar International’s Company Overview


Wilmar International Limited is a Singapore-based agribusiness company. The company's business activities include oil palm cultivation, oilseed crushing, edible oils refining, sugar milling and refining, manufacturing of consumer products, specialty fats, oleochemicals, biodiesel, and fertilizers, as well as rice and flour milling. Its Segments include Tropical Oils (plantation, manufacturing & merchandising); Oilseeds & Grains (manufacturing & consumer products); Sugar (milling, merchandising, refining & consumer products), and Others. It produces nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium (NPK) compound fertilizers and is also engaged in the merchandising of straight fertilizers, such as potash, phosphate, and nitrogen, and trace element products. It is engaged in the processing, refining, merchandising and distribution of oilseeds products, such as soybean oil and meal, sunflower seed oil and meal, cottonseed oil and meal, canola oil and meal, peanut oil and meal, and corn.

www.wilmar-international.com

Country: Ontario

Foundations date: 1991

Type: Public

Sector: Industrials

Categories: Agriculture


Wilmar International’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing:

Emotional: wellness, badge value

Functional: quality, variety, avoids hassles


Wilmar International’s Related Competitors


Bunge COFCO ADM Crofarm Monsanto Farmers Edge

Wilmar International’s Business Operations


Culture is brand:

It requires workers to live brand values to solve issues, make internal choices, and provide a branded consumer. Developing a distinctive and enduring cultural brand is the advertising industry's holy grail. Utilizing the hazy combination of time, attitude, and emotion to identify and replicate an ideology is near to marketing magic.

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Agribusiness:

Agribusiness is the manufacturing of agricultural products. Agrichemicals, breeding, crop production (and contract farming), distribution, farm equipment, processing, seed supply, and marketing and retail sales. Thus, the agribusiness system includes all food and fiber value chain agents and the institutions that affect it. The term agribusiness is simply a combination of agriculture and business within the agricultural sector, alluding to the wide variety of activities and disciplines that contemporary food production encompasses.

Brands consortium:

A collection of brands that coexist under the auspices of a parent business. The businesses in this pattern develop, produce, and market equipment. Their strength is in copywriting. Occasionally used to refer to a short-term agreement in which many companies (from the same or other industrial sectors or countries) combine their financial and personnel resources to execute a significant project benefiting all group members.

Cross-subsidiary:

When products and goods and products and services are integrated, they form a subsidiary side and a money side, maximizing the overall revenue impact. A subsidiary is a firm owned entirely or in part by another business, referred to as the parent company or holding company. A parent company with subsidiaries is a kind of conglomerate, a corporation that consists of several distinct companies; sometimes, the national or worldwide dispersion of the offices necessitates the establishment of subsidiaries.

Integrator:

A systems integrator is an individual or business specializing in integrating component subsystems into a unified whole and ensuring that those subsystems work correctly together. A process is known as system integration. Gains in efficiency, economies of scope, and less reliance on suppliers result in cost reductions and may improve the stability of value generation.

Performance-based contracting:

Performance-based contracting (PBC), sometimes referred to as performance-based logistics (PBL) or performance-based acquisition, is a method for achieving quantifiable supplier performance. A PBC strategy focuses on developing strategic performance measures and the direct correlation of contract payment to success against these criteria. Availability, dependability, maintainability, supportability, and total cost of ownership are all standard criteria. This is accomplished mainly via incentive-based, long-term contracts with precise and quantifiable operational performance targets set by the client and agreed upon by contractual parties.

Make and distribute:

In this arrangement, the producer creates the product and distributes it to distributors, who oversee the goods' ongoing management in the market.

Solution provider:

A solution provider consolidates all goods and services in a particular domain into a single point of contact. As a result, the client is supplied with a unique know-how to improve efficiency and performance. As a Solution Provider, a business may avoid revenue loss by broadening the scope of the service it offers, which adds value to the product. Additionally, close client interaction enables a better understanding of the customer's habits and requirements, enhancing goods and services.

Supply chain:

A supply chain is a network of companies, people, activities, data, and resources that facilitate the movement of goods and services from supplier to consumer. The supply chain processes natural resources, raw materials, and components into a completed product supplied to the ultimate consumer. In addition, used goods may re-enter the distribution network at any point where residual value is recyclable in advanced supply chain systems. Thus, value chains are connected through supply chains.

Layer player:

Companies that add value across many markets and sectors are referred to be layer players. Occasionally, specialist companies achieve dominance in a specific niche market. The effectiveness of their operations, along with their economies of size and footprint, establish the business as a market leader.

Low touch:

Historically, developing a standard touch sales model for business sales required recruiting and training a Salesforce user who was tasked with the responsibility of generating quality leads, arranging face-to-face meetings, giving presentations, and eventually closing transactions. However, the idea of a low-touch sales strategy is not new; it dates all the way back to the 1980s.

Why Wilmar International’s Business Model is so successful?

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