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Petroalacant’s Business Strategy Case Study

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Petroalacant’s Company Overview


Petroalacant is a company born in Alicante in 1995 with the aim of offering integral services within the hydrocarbons sector, fulfilling the expectations of our clients.

http://petroalacant.com/

Country: Spain

Foundations date: 1995

Type: Private

Sector: Consumer Goods

Categories: O&G


Petroalacant’s Customer Needs


Social impact: Self-transcendence

Life changing: self-actualization, affiliation/belonging

Emotional: attractiveness, provides access

Functional: integrates, reduces cost, quality, avoids hassles, connects


Petroalacant’s Related Competitors


Enbridge Gazprom Halliburton Pertamina Phillips 66 Repsol

Petroalacant’s Business Operations


Barter:

Without currency, it is a kind of trading in which products or services are traded. Typically used during periods of high inflation or scarcity of money, barter has become a popular method of negotiating agreements such as offers to purchase excess products in return for advertising space or time. With the introduction of the internet, bartering shifted from a largely person-to-person transaction to a primarily business-to-business one, where every day, commodities ranging from manufacturing capacity to steel and paper are bartered across international boundaries.

Credits:

A credit arrangement is when a consumer purchases items on credit (without paying cash) and spends the provider later. Typically, trade credit is extended for a certain number of days after the products are delivered. These credits may be deducted from one's tax liability.

Cross-selling:

Cross-selling is a business strategy in which additional services or goods are offered to the primary offering to attract new consumers and retain existing ones. Numerous businesses are increasingly diversifying their product lines with items that have little resemblance to their primary offerings. Walmart is one such example; they used to offer everything but food. They want their stores to function as one-stop shops. Thus, companies mitigate their reliance on particular items and increase overall sustainability by providing other goods and services.

Culture is brand:

It requires workers to live brand values to solve issues, make internal choices, and provide a branded consumer. Developing a distinctive and enduring cultural brand is the advertising industry's holy grail. Utilizing the hazy combination of time, attitude, and emotion to identify and replicate an ideology is near to marketing magic.

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Direct selling:

Direct selling refers to a situation in which a company's goods are immediately accessible from the manufacturer or service provider rather than via intermediate channels. The business avoids the retail margin and any extra expenses connected with the intermediaries in this manner. These savings may be passed on to the client, establishing a consistent sales experience. Furthermore, such intimate touch may help to strengthen client connections. Finally, direct selling benefits consumers by providing convenience and service, such as personal demonstrations and explanations of goods, home delivery, and substantial satisfaction guarantees.

Discount club:

The discount club concept is built on perpetual high-discount deals utilized as a continual marketing plan or a brief period (usually one day). This might be seen as a reduction in the face value of an invoice prepared in advance of its payments in the medium or long term.

Donation-based:

Crowdfunding for charity purposes is a collaborative effort by people to aid charitable projects. Civic crowdfunding is a kind of charity crowdfunding in which money is collected to improve public life and space.

Embedded social enterprises:

The built-in social model is predicated on the premise that everyone wants to do good and lose weight in their awareness in a highly consumerist society. Toms Shoes was the first business to establish a successful strategy for include contributions in the value of its bids. Concentrating on shoe sales, the company gained notoriety in the media and its consumers when they announced that another team is given to a charity for every pair of shoes bought.

Membership club:

Belonging to a group, either individually or collectively. Certain memberships may charge a fee to join or participate, while others are free. Others have particular skill criteria that must be met before membership is granted. Members are entitled to specific benefits or advantages, but not all members may enjoy the same rights and privileges. Another method is taken by a members-only luxury lifestyle management business that offers concierge services such as vacation reservations, restaurant suggestions, and event access.

Regular replacement:

It includes items that must be replaced on a regular basis; the user cannot reuse them. Consumables are products utilized by people and companies and must be returned regularly due to wear and tear or depletion. Additionally, they may be described as components of a final product consumed or irreversibly changed throughout the production process, including semiconductor wafers and basic chemicals.

Reseller:

Resellers are businesses or individuals (merchants) that acquire products or services to resell them instead of consuming or utilizing them. This is often done for financial gain (but could be resold at a loss). Resellers are well-known for doing business on the internet through websites. One instance is the telecommunications sector, in which corporations purchase surplus transmission capacity or take the call from other providers and resell it to regional carriers.

Robin Hood:

They 'rob' the wealthy and give to the needy, which distinguishes them from their main competitor, who does the polar opposite. Products and services are used by 'the poor' for a low or even no cost, while 'the wealthy' pay a more fantastic price. In addition, it contributes to brand recognition and makes 'the wealthy' feel better about purchasing since it benefits impoverished people. The most outstanding example is TOMS Shoes, which gives one pair of shoes to a kid in need for every couple sold to customers.

Solution provider:

A solution provider consolidates all goods and services in a particular domain into a single point of contact. As a result, the client is supplied with a unique know-how to improve efficiency and performance. As a Solution Provider, a business may avoid revenue loss by broadening the scope of the service it offers, which adds value to the product. Additionally, close client interaction enables a better understanding of the customer's habits and requirements, enhancing goods and services.

Why Petroalacant’s Business Model is so successful?

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