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Why British Airways's Business Model is so successful?

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British Airways’s Company Overview


British Airways (BA) is one of the world's leading global airlines, headquartered in London, England. Established in 1974, the airline operates an extensive global route network, including flights to major international airports. British Airways is known for its superior service, reliability, and commitment to customer satisfaction. The company, which is part of the International Airlines Group (IAG), operates a diverse fleet of aircraft and offers various services, including passenger flights, cargo transportation, and aviation services. BA's commitment to sustainability is evident in its pledge to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. Business Model: British Airways operates on a full-service network carrier business model. This model includes providing multiple classes of service (First, Business, Premium Economy, Economy), operating a hub-and-spoke route network, and participating in one of the major airline alliances - in this case, the Oneworld Alliance. The airline's strategy is to connect passengers from around the world through its central hub at London Heathrow Airport, offering direct flights and connections to various destinations. BA also provides ancillary services such as hotel bookings, car rentals, and holiday packages, enhancing the customer experience while diversifying its income streams. Revenue Model: British Airways' primary revenue source is from selling air tickets. The airline has multiple fare classes, each with different price points and service levels, allowing it to cater to a broad range of customers. In addition to passenger revenue, BA also generates substantial income from its cargo business by transporting goods and mail on its aircraft. Ancillary revenue is another significant aspect of BA's revenue model. This includes income from additional services such as excess baggage fees, seat selection fees, onboard sales, and partnerships with hotels and car rental companies. Lastly, BA's frequent flyer program, the Executive Club, also contributes to its revenue through partnerships with credit card companies and other businesses.

https://www.britishairways.com/travel/home/public/en_us/

Country: England

Foundations date: 1974

Type: Public

Sector: Transportation

Categories: Airlines


British Airways’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: rewards me, design/aesthetics, badge value, provides access

Functional: connects, quality, informs


British Airways’s Related Competitors



British Airways’s Business Operations


Advertising:

This approach generated money by sending promotional marketing messages from other businesses to customers. When you establish a for-profit company, one of the most critical aspects of your strategy is determining how to generate income. Many companies sell either products or services or a mix of the two. However, advertisers are frequently the source of the majority of all of the revenue for online businesses and media organizations. This is referred to as an ad-based income model.

Affiliation:

Commissions are used in the affiliate revenue model example. Essentially, you resell goods from other merchants or businesses on your website or in your physical store. You are then compensated for referring new consumers to the company offering the goods or services. Affiliates often use a pay-per-sale or pay-per-display model. As a result, the business can access a more diversified prospective client base without extra active sales or marketing efforts. Affiliate marketing is a popular internet business strategy with significant potential for growth. When a client purchases via a referral link, the affiliate gets a portion of the transaction's cost.

Archetypes of business model design:

The business model archetypes include many business personalities and more than one business model linked to various goods or services. There is a common foundation behind the scenes of each unit, but from a management standpoint, each group may operate independently.

Best in class services:

When a firm brings a product to market, it must first create a compelling product and then field a workforce capable of manufacturing it at a competitive price. Neither task is simple to perform effectively; much managerial effort and scholarly study have been dedicated to these issues. Nevertheless, providing a service involves another aspect: managing clients, who are consumers of the service and may also contribute to its creation.

Cash machine:

The cash machine business model allows companies to obtain money from sales since consumers pay ahead for the goods they purchase, but the costs required to generate the revenue are not yet paid. This increases companies' liquidity, which they may use to pay off debt or make additional investments. Among several others, the online store Amazon often employs this business model.

Codifying a distinctive service capability:

Since their inception, information technology systems have aided in automating corporate operations, increasing productivity, and maximizing efficiency. Now, businesses can take their perfected processes, standardize them, and sell them to other parties. In today's corporate environment, innovation is critical for survival.

Credits:

A credit arrangement is when a consumer purchases items on credit (without paying cash) and spends the provider later. Typically, trade credit is extended for a certain number of days after the products are delivered. These credits may be deducted from one's tax liability.

Cross-selling:

Cross-selling is a business strategy in which additional services or goods are offered to the primary offering to attract new consumers and retain existing ones. Numerous businesses are increasingly diversifying their product lines with items that have little resemblance to their primary offerings. Walmart is one such example; they used to offer everything but food. They want their stores to function as one-stop shops. Thus, companies mitigate their reliance on particular items and increase overall sustainability by providing other goods and services.

Cross-subsidiary:

When products and goods and products and services are integrated, they form a subsidiary side and a money side, maximizing the overall revenue impact. A subsidiary is a firm owned entirely or in part by another business, referred to as the parent company or holding company. A parent company with subsidiaries is a kind of conglomerate, a corporation that consists of several distinct companies; sometimes, the national or worldwide dispersion of the offices necessitates the establishment of subsidiaries.

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Customer relationship:

Due to the high cost of client acquisition, acquiring a sizable wallet share, economies of scale are crucial. Customer relationship management (CRM) is a technique for dealing with a business's interactions with current and prospective customers that aims to analyze data about customers' interactions with a company to improve business relationships with customers, with a particular emphasis on retention, and ultimately to drive sales growth.

Decomposition:

Simplifying many product kinds inside a product group or set of goods. A technique for doing business analysis in which a complex business process is dissected to reveal its constituent parts. Functional decomposition is a technique that may be used to contribute to an understanding and management of large and complicated processes and assist in issue solving. Additionally, functional decomposition is utilized in computer engineering to aid in the creation of software.

Direct selling:

Direct selling refers to a situation in which a company's goods are immediately accessible from the manufacturer or service provider rather than via intermediate channels. The business avoids the retail margin and any extra expenses connected with the intermediaries in this manner. These savings may be passed on to the client, establishing a consistent sales experience. Furthermore, such intimate touch may help to strengthen client connections. Finally, direct selling benefits consumers by providing convenience and service, such as personal demonstrations and explanations of goods, home delivery, and substantial satisfaction guarantees.

Discount club:

The discount club concept is built on perpetual high-discount deals utilized as a continual marketing plan or a brief period (usually one day). This might be seen as a reduction in the face value of an invoice prepared in advance of its payments in the medium or long term.

Dynamic pricing:

This pattern allows the business to adjust its rates in response to national or regional trends. Dynamic pricing is a pricing technique known as surge pricing, demand pricing, or time-based pricing. In which companies establish variable prices for their goods or services in response to changing market conditions. Companies may adjust their rates based on algorithms that consider rival pricing, supply and demand, and other market variables. Dynamic pricing is widely used in various sectors, including hospitality, travel, entertainment, retail, energy, and public transportation.

From push to pull:

In business, a push-pull system refers to the flow of a product or information between two parties. Customers pull the products or information they need on markets, while offerers or suppliers push them toward them. In logistics and supply chains, stages often operate in both push and pull modes. For example, push production is forecasted demand, while pull production is actual or consumer demand. The push-pull border or decoupling point is the contact between these phases. Wal-Mart is a case of a company that employs a push vs. a pull approach.

Membership club:

Belonging to a group, either individually or collectively. Certain memberships may charge a fee to join or participate, while others are free. Others have particular skill criteria that must be met before membership is granted. Members are entitled to specific benefits or advantages, but not all members may enjoy the same rights and privileges. Another method is taken by a members-only luxury lifestyle management business that offers concierge services such as vacation reservations, restaurant suggestions, and event access.

Performance-based contracting:

Performance-based contracting (PBC), sometimes referred to as performance-based logistics (PBL) or performance-based acquisition, is a method for achieving quantifiable supplier performance. A PBC strategy focuses on developing strategic performance measures and the direct correlation of contract payment to success against these criteria. Availability, dependability, maintainability, supportability, and total cost of ownership are all standard criteria. This is accomplished mainly via incentive-based, long-term contracts with precise and quantifiable operational performance targets set by the client and agreed upon by contractual parties.

Sponsorship:

In most instances, support is not intended to be philanthropic; instead, it is a mutually beneficial commercial relationship. In the highly competitive sponsorship climate of sport, a business aligning its brand with a mark seeks a variety of economic, public relations, and product placement benefits. Sponsors also seek to establish public trust, acceptability, or alignment with the perceived image a sport has built or acquired by leveraging their connection with an athlete, team, league, or the sport itself.

Ultimate luxury:

This business approach is based on product distinctiveness and a high level of quality, emphasizing individuals with significant buying power. The expenditures required to create distinction are covered by the comparatively high prices charged, which often allow for very high profits.

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