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Why Tunein's Business Model is so successful?

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Tunein’s Company Overview


TuneIn is a leading global online radio service that provides its users with live news, sports, music, podcasts, and radio from around the world. With over 100,000 live radio stations and 5.7 million on-demand programs stemming from every continent, TuneIn seeks to reinvent the way people listen to the radio by making it a more personalized and seamless experience. The company's mission is to deliver the world’s best listening experiences by offering a wide variety of content and making it accessible to everyone, everywhere, regardless of the platform or device they use. Founded in 2002, TuneIn is headquartered in San Francisco, California, and serves more than 60 million active users each month. TuneIn's business model revolves around two main sources: its free ad-supported service and its premium subscription-based service. The free service allows users to listen to a vast array of radio stations, podcasts, and shows, but includes advertisements. TuneIn's premium service, on the other hand, offers an ad-free listening experience, access to exclusive content, and additional features for a monthly fee. This dual approach allows TuneIn to cater to a wide range of users, from casual listeners to avid fans seeking premium content. The company's revenue model is primarily based on advertising and premium subscriptions. TuneIn generates ad revenue by selling ad spaces to advertisers who want to reach their large and diverse user base. The ads are played during breaks on the free service. On the other hand, the premium subscription revenue comes from users who pay a monthly fee for an enhanced listening experience. This dual revenue stream allows TuneIn to maintain its free service for users who do not wish to pay, while also providing a premium option for those who want an ad-free experience and access to exclusive content.

https://tunein.com/

Country: California

Foundations date: 2002

Type: Private

Sector: Information & Media

Categories: Entertainment


Tunein’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: fun/entertainment, provides access, design/aesthetics

Functional: connects, variety, informs


Tunein’s Related Competitors



Tunein’s Business Operations


Channel aggregation:

Consolidating numerous distribution routes into one to achieve greater economic efficiency. A business model for internet commerce in which a company (that does not manufacture or warehouse any item) gathers (aggregates) information about products and services from many competing sources and displays it on its website. The firm's strength is in its power to create an 'environment' that attracts users to its website and develop a system that facilitates pricing and specification matching.

Advertising:

This approach generated money by sending promotional marketing messages from other businesses to customers. When you establish a for-profit company, one of the most critical aspects of your strategy is determining how to generate income. Many companies sell either products or services or a mix of the two. However, advertisers are frequently the source of the majority of all of the revenue for online businesses and media organizations. This is referred to as an ad-based income model.

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Digital:

A digital strategy is a strategic management and a business reaction or solution to a digital issue, which is often best handled as part of a broader company plan. A digital strategy is frequently defined by the application of new technologies to existing business activities and a focus on enabling new digital skills for their company (such as those formed by the Information Age and frequently as a result of advances in digital technologies such as computers, data, telecommunication services, and the World wide web, to name a few).

Freemium:

Freemium is the sum of the words free and premium and refers to a business strategy that provides both free and premium services. The freemium business model works by providing essential services for free and charging for enhanced or extra capabilities. This is a typical practice among many software firms, who offer imperative software for free with restricted functionality, and it is also a popular approach among game developers. While everyone is invited to play the game for free, extra lives and unique game features are accessible only once the player buys.

Integrator:

A systems integrator is an individual or business specializing in integrating component subsystems into a unified whole and ensuring that those subsystems work correctly together. A process is known as system integration. Gains in efficiency, economies of scope, and less reliance on suppliers result in cost reductions and may improve the stability of value generation.

On-demand economy:

The on-demand economy is described as economic activity generated by digital marketplaces that meet customer demand for products and services via quick access and accessible supply. The supply chain is managed via a highly efficient, intuitive digital mesh built on top of current infrastructure networks. The on-demand economy is transforming commercial behavior in cities worldwide. The number of businesses, the categories covered, and the industry's growth rate are all increasing. Businesses in this new economy are the culmination of years of technological progress and customer behavior change.

Mobile first behavior:

It is intended to mean that as a company thinks about its website or its other digital means of communications, it should be thinking critically about the mobile experience and how customers and employees will interact with it from their many devices. The term is “mobile first,” and it is intended to mean that as a company thinks about its website or its other digital means of communications, it should be thinking critically about the mobile experience and how customers and employees will interact with it from their many devices.

Long tail:

The long tail is a strategy that allows businesses to realize significant profit out of selling low volumes of hard-to-find items to many customers instead of only selling large volumes of a reduced number of popular items. The term was coined in 2004 by Chris Anderson, who argued that products in low demand or with low sales volume can collectively make up market share that rivals or exceeds the relatively few current bestsellers and blockbusters but only if the store or distribution channel is large enough.

Online marketplace:

An online marketplace (or online e-commerce marketplace) is a kind of e-commerce website in which product or service information is supplied by various third parties or, in some instances, the brand itself, while the marketplace operator handles transactions. Additionally, this pattern encompasses peer-to-peer (P2P) e-commerce between businesses or people. By and large, since marketplaces aggregate goods from a diverse range of suppliers, the variety and availability are typically greater than in vendor-specific online retail shops. Additionally, pricing might be more competitive.

Subscription:

Subscription business models are built on the concept of providing a product or service in exchange for recurring subscription income on a monthly or annual basis. As a result, they place a higher premium on client retention than on customer acquisition. Subscription business models, in essence, concentrate on revenue generation in such a manner that a single client makes repeated payments for extended access to a product or service. Cable television, internet providers, software suppliers, websites (e.g., blogs), business solutions providers, and financial services companies utilize this approach, as do conventional newspapers, periodicals, and academic publications.

Music:

The music industry comprises businesses and people that make money by producing new songs and pieces and selling live performances and events, audio and video recordings, compositions, sheet music, and organizations and organizations that assist and represent artists. The music industry in the twenty-first century is a textbook example of disruptive technology, in which new technologies displace existing technologies and business models.

Tiered service:

Users may choose from a limited number of levels with gradually rising price points to get the product or goods that are most appropriate for their requirements. Such systems are widely used in the telecommunications industry, particularly in the areas of cellular service, digital and cable television, and broadband internet access. Users may choose from a limited number of levels with gradually rising price points to get the product or goods that are most appropriate for their requirements.

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