This web app uses cookies to compile statistic information of our users visits. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. If you wish you may change your preference or read about cookies

close

Twenty-First Century Fox’s Business Strategy Case Study

Embed code:

x
Copy the code below and embed it in yours to show this business model canvas in your website.

Twenty-First Century Fox’s Company Overview


Twenty-First Century Fox, Inc., incorporated on October 23, 2003, is a media and entertainment company. The company's Segments include Cable Network Programming; Television; Filmed Entertainment, and Other, Corporate and Eliminations. The company's activities are conducted principally in the United States, the United Kingdom, Continental Europe, Asia and Latin America. The company competes with CNN, MSNBC, CNBC, Bloomberg Television, ESPN, NBC Sports Network, Golf Channel, NFL Network, NHL Network, NBA TV, MLB Network, Major League Baseball Advanced Media, Yahoo Sports, Twitter, USA, TNT, Spike TV, Home Box Office, Inc., Showtime Networks, Netflix, Amazon, YouTube, Discovery Channel, History, Animal Planet, Travel Channel, Science, VICELAND, American Heroes Channel, FYI, Tru TV, Discovery Communications, A&E Television Networks, ABC Television Network, NBC broadcast network, CBS Television Network and The CW Television Network.

www.21cf.com

Country: New York

Foundations date: 1913

Type: Public

Sector: Information & Media

Categories: Entertainment


Twenty-First Century Fox’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: heirloom

Emotional: attractiveness, design/aesthetics, provides access, fun/entertainment

Functional: quality, variety, connects, informs


Twenty-First Century Fox’s Related Competitors


The Walt Disney Company Hulu Time Warner Audible iPod / iTunes Patreon

Twenty-First Century Fox’s Business Operations


Acquiring non customers:

Acquiring non customers who traditionally did not seem to be the target of customer value proposition. Customer acquisition refers to gaining new consumers. Acquiring new customers involves persuading consumers to purchase a company’s products and/or services. Companies and organizations consider the cost of customer acquisition as an important measure in evaluating how much value customers bring to their businesses.

Advertising:

This approach generated money by sending promotional marketing messages from other businesses to customers. When you establish a for-profit company, one of the most critical aspects of your strategy is determining how to generate income. Many companies sell either products or services or a mix of the two. However, advertisers are frequently the source of the majority of all of the revenue for online businesses and media organizations. This is referred to as an ad-based income model.

Cross-selling:

Cross-selling is a business strategy in which additional services or goods are offered to the primary offering to attract new consumers and retain existing ones. Numerous businesses are increasingly diversifying their product lines with items that have little resemblance to their primary offerings. Walmart is one such example; they used to offer everything but food. They want their stores to function as one-stop shops. Thus, companies mitigate their reliance on particular items and increase overall sustainability by providing other goods and services.

Cross-subsidiary:

When products and goods and products and services are integrated, they form a subsidiary side and a money side, maximizing the overall revenue impact. A subsidiary is a firm owned entirely or in part by another business, referred to as the parent company or holding company. A parent company with subsidiaries is a kind of conglomerate, a corporation that consists of several distinct companies; sometimes, the national or worldwide dispersion of the offices necessitates the establishment of subsidiaries.

Customer loyalty:

Customer loyalty is a very successful business strategy. It entails giving consumers value that extends beyond the product or service itself. It is often provided through incentive-based programs such as member discounts, coupons, birthday discounts, and points. Today, most businesses have some kind of incentive-based programs, such as American Airlines, which rewards customers with points for each trip they take with them.

Dynamic branding:

Dynamic branding is a technique for refreshing your identity without totally altering it. You can link to anything; you may modify the logo according to the seasons or for a particular event. It has been proven effective many times. However, it does not work for every business.

Integrator:

A systems integrator is an individual or business specializing in integrating component subsystems into a unified whole and ensuring that those subsystems work correctly together. A process is known as system integration. Gains in efficiency, economies of scope, and less reliance on suppliers result in cost reductions and may improve the stability of value generation.

Licensing:

A formal agreement in which the owner of the copyright, know-how, patent, service mark, trademark, or other intellectual property grants a licensee the right to use, manufacture, and sell copies of the original. These agreements often restrict the licensee's scope or area of operation, define whether the license is exclusive or non-exclusive, and stipulate whether the licensee will pay royalties or another kind of compensation in return. While licensing agreements are often used to commercialize the technology, franchisees also utilize them to encourage the sale of products and services.

Long tail:

The long tail is a strategy that allows businesses to realize significant profit out of selling low volumes of hard-to-find items to many customers instead of only selling large volumes of a reduced number of popular items. The term was coined in 2004 by Chris Anderson, who argued that products in low demand or with low sales volume can collectively make up market share that rivals or exceeds the relatively few current bestsellers and blockbusters but only if the store or distribution channel is large enough.

Make and distribute:

In this arrangement, the producer creates the product and distributes it to distributors, who oversee the goods' ongoing management in the market.

Mass customization:

Mass customization is a strategy that entails using modular goods and manufacturing processes to allow efficient product individualization. Mass customization refers to producing customized output using flexible computer-aided manufacturing systems in marketing, manufacturing, contact centers, and management. Mass customization is the next frontier for manufacturing and service sectors alike. Beyond the physical product, mass customization is utilized by a diverse variety of software products and services with the goal of developing strong connections with customers via personalization and suggestion.

Music:

The music industry comprises businesses and people that make money by producing new songs and pieces and selling live performances and events, audio and video recordings, compositions, sheet music, and organizations and organizations that assist and represent artists. The music industry in the twenty-first century is a textbook example of disruptive technology, in which new technologies displace existing technologies and business models.

Sponsorship:

In most instances, support is not intended to be philanthropic; instead, it is a mutually beneficial commercial relationship. In the highly competitive sponsorship climate of sport, a business aligning its brand with a mark seeks a variety of economic, public relations, and product placement benefits. Sponsors also seek to establish public trust, acceptability, or alignment with the perceived image a sport has built or acquired by leveraging their connection with an athlete, team, league, or the sport itself.

Why Twenty-First Century Fox’s Business Model is so successful?

Discover now