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Why Yimidida's Business Model is so successful?

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Yimidida’s Company Overview


Yimidida is a leading Chinese logistics service provider that specializes in less-than-truckload (LTL) shipping. Established in 2015, the company is headquartered in Shanghai, China, and operates an extensive network that spans over 300 cities and 2,800 districts across the country. Yimidida leverages advanced technology and a robust infrastructure to offer reliable and efficient logistics solutions to a wide range of industries. It prides itself on its customer-centric approach, offering tailored solutions that meet the unique needs of its clients. Business Model: Yimidida operates on a platform-based business model, leveraging its extensive network of logistics resources to provide comprehensive LTL shipping solutions. The company utilizes a unique combination of online and offline strategies to facilitate the delivery of goods across China. The online platform, which includes a mobile app, enables customers to place orders, track shipments, and manage their logistics needs seamlessly. Offline, Yimidida has established service stations throughout the country, which serve as transfer and sorting centers, ensuring the efficient and timely delivery of goods. Revenue Model: Yimidida's primary source of revenue is the fees it charges for its logistics services. This includes pick-up, delivery, freight forwarding services, and value-added services such as packaging, warehousing, and supply chain management. The company also earns revenue from its online platform through advertising and premium features that enhance its users' functionality. Additionally, Yimidida has established strategic partnerships with various businesses, offering integrated logistics solutions that generate additional income.

https://www.yimidida.com/

Country: China

Foundations date: 2014

Type: Private

Sector: Transportation

Categories: Logistics


Yimidida’s Customer Needs


Social impact:

Life changing: affiliation/belonging

Emotional: provides access

Functional: connects, integrates, reduces cost, organizes


Yimidida’s Related Competitors



Yimidida’s Business Operations


Community-funded:

The critical resource in this business strategy is a community's intellect. Three distinct consumer groups comprise this multifaceted business model: believers, suppliers, and purchasers. First, believers join the online community platform and contribute to the production of goods by vendors. Second, buyers purchase these goods, which may be visual, aural, or literary in nature. Finally, believers may be purchasers or providers, and vice versa.

Cross-selling:

Cross-selling is a business strategy in which additional services or goods are offered to the primary offering to attract new consumers and retain existing ones. Numerous businesses are increasingly diversifying their product lines with items that have little resemblance to their primary offerings. Walmart is one such example; they used to offer everything but food. They want their stores to function as one-stop shops. Thus, companies mitigate their reliance on particular items and increase overall sustainability by providing other goods and services.

Crowdsourcing:

Crowdsourcing is a kind of sourcing in which people or organizations solicit donations from Internet users to acquire required services or ideas. Crowdsourcing differs from outsourcing because work may originate from an undefined public (rather than being commissioned from a particular, identified organization). In addition, those crowdsourcing procedures are a combination of bottom-up and top-down. The benefits of crowdsourcing may include reduced prices, increased speed, better quality, increased flexibility, scalability, and variety. An anonymous crowd adopts a solution to a task or issue, usually through the internet. Contributors are compensated or have the opportunity to win a prize if their answer is selected for manufacturing or sale. Customer engagement and inclusion may help build a good rapport with them, resulting in increased sales and income.

eCommerce:

Electronic commerce, or e-commerce (alternatively spelled eCommerce), is a business model, or a subset of a larger business model, that allows a company or person to do business via an electronic network, usually the internet. As a result, customers gain from increased accessibility and convenience, while the business benefits from integrating sales and distribution with other internal operations. Electronic commerce is prevalent throughout all four main market segments: business to business, business to consumer, consumer to consumer, and consumer to business. Ecommerce may be used to sell almost any goods or service, from books and music to financial services and airline tickets.

Mobile first behavior:

It is intended to mean that as a company thinks about its website or its other digital means of communications, it should be thinking critically about the mobile experience and how customers and employees will interact with it from their many devices. The term is “mobile first,” and it is intended to mean that as a company thinks about its website or its other digital means of communications, it should be thinking critically about the mobile experience and how customers and employees will interact with it from their many devices.

Orchestrator:

Orchestrators are businesses that outsource a substantial portion of their operations and processes to third-party service providers or third-party vendors. The fundamental objective of this business strategy is to concentrate internal resources on core and essential functions while contracting out the remainder of the work to other businesses, thus reducing costs.

Platform as a Service (PaaS):

Platform as a Service (PaaS) is a class of cloud computing services that enable users to create, operate, and manage apps without the burden of establishing and maintaining the infrastructure usually involved with designing and developing an app.

Software as a Service (SaaS):

Software as a Service (SaaS) is a paradigm for licensing and delivering subscription-based and centrally hosted software. Occasionally, the term on-demand software is used. SaaS is usually accessible through a web browser via a thin client. SaaS has established itself as the de facto delivery mechanism for a large number of commercial apps. SaaS has been integrated into virtually every major enterprise Software company's strategy.

Supply chain:

A supply chain is a network of companies, people, activities, data, and resources that facilitate the movement of goods and services from supplier to consumer. The supply chain processes natural resources, raw materials, and components into a completed product supplied to the ultimate consumer. In addition, used goods may re-enter the distribution network at any point where residual value is recyclable in advanced supply chain systems. Thus, value chains are connected through supply chains.

Transaction facilitator:

The business acts as an acquirer, processing payments on behalf of online merchants, auction sites, and other commercial users for a fee. This encompasses all elements of purchasing, selling, and exchanging currencies at current or predetermined exchange rates. By far the biggest market in the world in terms of trade volume. The largest multinational banks are the leading players in this industry. Around the globe, financial hubs serve as anchors for trade between a diverse range of various kinds of buyers and sellers 24 hours a day, save on weekends.

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